<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id="toolbar" class="toolbar-container"> </div>
    <div class="container" style="--line-height:1.6em;" dir="ltr">
      <div class="header reader-header reader-show-element"> <font
          size="-2"><a class="domain reader-domain"
href="https://crimestory.com/2020/08/03/interview-kevin-sharp-on-the-case-of-leonard-peltier/">https://crimestory.com/2020/08/03/interview-kevin-sharp-on-the-case-of-leonard-peltier/</a></font>
        <h1 class="reader-title">Interview: Kevin Sharp, on the Case of
          Leonard Peltier</h1>
        <div class="meta-data">
          <div class="reader-estimated-time" dir="ltr">August 3, 2020<br>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
      <hr>
      <div class="content">
        <div class="moz-reader-content reader-show-element">
          <div id="readability-page-1" class="page">
            <div>
              <p><strong>The Case of Leonard Peltier: An Interview with
                  Kevin Sharp</strong></p>
              <p>On June 26, 1975, FBI agents Jack Coler and Ron
                Williams died in a shootout on the Pine Ridge Indian
                Reservation in South Dakota. The man who has spent the
                last 44 years in prison for aiding and abetting their
                murders is now 75-year-old Leonard Peltier, a member of
                the <a href="http://www.aimovement.org/">American
                  Indian Movement</a>, AIM, which seeks to address
                systemic racism and police brutality towards Native
                Americans. Former U.S. District Judge Kevin Sharp, who
                now represents Peltier, says that not only is Peltier
                innocent, he’s the longest serving political prisoner in
                American history.</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>My name is Kevin Sharp. I am practicing law in
                Nashville, Tennessee. I was, for six years, a Federal
                District Court judge, which is the trial level judge in
                the federal system. I was appointed by President Obama,
                unanimously confirmed by a Republican controlled Senate
                and I took the bench in May of 2011. I practiced law
                before that, in a small plaintiffs firm that I had
                started. Prior to doing that, I had worked for Congress
                as a lawyer. I wanted to go to law school while I was
                serving in the Navy, and I eventually was nominated and
                appointed to the federal bench. I think I was a pretty
                good judge. I still hear from lawyers who say, “We wish
                you were back.” I was “a lawyer’s judge.” </p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong> </p>
              <p>What does that mean? </p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong> </p>
              <p>That one: it was about people. And that two: lawyers
                have a really hard job, and the last thing they need is
                a judge just riding them because they can. There’s a
                condition, I don’t know if you’ve ever heard of this,
                it’s called black robe fever. And it happens to people
                who are otherwise nice people before they take the
                bench, and then they put on a black robe and all of a
                sudden they think they are gods. And they begin to treat
                others differently.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong></p>
              <p>Wow, that’s great. </p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>I never got that. And one of the reasons for that was
                that the job was never about me. It was always about the
                position. And it becomes part of the reason that I end
                up stepping down from that job. There’s a judge who was
                here in Nashville, a guy named Todd Campbell. He’s no
                longer on the bench, but Todd told me that one of the
                hardest things you’re going to have to do, the law is
                not difficult, but it’s going to be the most difficult
                thing you do, and that’s the criminal side, because the
                rest of it generally is about money. The criminal side
                is about people’s liberty. And that’s where you’ve got
                to be careful. Well, one of the things that drove me
                crazy were mandatory minimums. You know, mandatory 10
                and 15 year sentences and I’m thinking, “This is insane.
                Why are we doing this? This is a 15 month sentence, not
                a 15 year sentence.” And then I eventually had to
                sentence three guys to life in prison for nonviolent
                drug offenses. Shortly after that, I stepped down and
                came back into private practice. I joined Sanford
                Heisler. It’s now Sanford Heisler Sharp. This firm was
                great. Gave me a platform. Said, “Whatever it is that
                you think is important, we think is important.” It’s a
                civil rights firm. So that’s how I got here. With
                respect to Leonard though, I am 57. So in 1975, I’m 12.
                At that time, there were only three television stations
                ― four if you count public broadcasting. It was all the
                same. And at night, everybody would sit down, you get
                your TV tray and you sit in front of the TV and you
                listen to the news. So I had a vague recollection of
                this happening, but not much, because the ‘70s were a
                fairly violent time. You had Munich, Patty Hearst. You
                had way too many airplane hijackings. You got Vietnam
                body counts. It just seemed to be a very violent time.
                And it all just kind of ran together for a 12-year-old
                kid, particularly in June of ’75, when school’s out and
                I’m more worried about baseball practice, but when I
                stepped down, I had done an interview with the
                Tennessean, our local newspaper, about the case with
                Chris Young and his two defendants I had to send to life
                in prison, and how unjust I thought that was. Well, that
                article comes out and I start getting lots of letters.
                One day, I get this big packet in the mail. And I
                remember saying to the person who had picked up the mail
                that day, she says, “Kevin, here’s something else for
                you.” And I could tell that it fit into that category.
                And usually what I did was I would just let them kind of
                pile up for the week, and we’d get to them on Thursday
                or Friday, just kind of go through them at once.
                Otherwise, they consumed my day. And I remember telling
                her to just throw it in the pile, and then I turned
                around, and came back and go, “You know what, why don’t
                you give me that one?” It was a big, yellow, thick
                envelope. I was like, “I’ll take that one.” It just felt
                different. I took it in my office and I opened it up.
                And it was this Leonard Peltier story. And again, I had
                this vague recollection of this stuff happening. I don’t
                know if what I was remembering was the Pine Ridge
                shooting or the Wounded Knee siege. I was familiar with
                the AIM takeover at Alcatraz. And I just start reading
                this thing and my day is gone, because I sat there the
                whole day reading transcripts, newspaper clippings,
                looking at photographs, reading Civil Rights Commission
                reports, portions of the Church Committee, and I am
                sucked into this thing. And I remember thinking, “This
                can’t be true.” This is not the America that I served in
                the Navy. We weren’t the bad guys, but I’m looking
                through here thinking, “I think we may be the bad guys
                here.” It was just rabbit holes everywhere. It makes me
                a little bit nauseous as I’m reading it. I mean, you
                hear the stories, but they’re just stories. This wasn’t
                a story. These were people’s lives and liberty. The FBI
                and the U.S. Attorney and the federal judges, their
                responsibility is to make sure that justice is served,
                not just getting convictions. That’s not what I see in
                this file. And it’s sickening. And so I call, there was
                a lawyer in Texas who sent it to me, and he knew Leonard
                and said, “Leonard would like you to take up his case.”
                We were put in touch with each other, I met Leonard, and
                we spent a lot of time talking about his case. In
                addition to reading everything, I just wanted to look at
                him, talk to him, and hear the story from him looking in
                his eyes. Not that it really mattered to me. I was not
                focused on who did what. What was more important to me
                at the time were the constitutional violations. I’m
                thinking, “I don’t know if he did it, but here’s what I
                do know: nobody knows if he did it, because look at the
                mess the FBI and the U.S. Attorney created trying to pin
                this on him.” They didn’t care about the Constitution.
                They didn’t care about anybody’s rights. What they
                wanted was to convict somebody for a wrong that they
                perceived had been done to them―the shooting of these
                two agents. That’s what they cared about, the rest of it
                be damned. And that, to me, was infuriating and
                sickening. I spent the next year going through this.
                What I’ve found through that process is I don’t think he
                did it. The evidence isn’t there. They don’t know who
                did it. There was an interview with James Reynolds, the
                U.S. Attorney on this case. I saw a Q&A with him in
                a magazine where the reporter said, “Did you pick the
                wrong man?” And he says, “I don’t know.” I’m thinking,
                “What the hell? You don’t know? Well, he’s got two life
                sentences. If you don’t know, who knows? It’s your job
                to know before you send someone to prison for life.” And
                they don’t know. They all admit they don’t know. Matter
                of fact, Glenn Crooks, who is the lead prosecutor,
                admitted to the Court of Appeals, “We don’t know who
                shot the agents and what participation Mr. Peltier had,
                if any. And there’s no evidence that he had any role in
                this except that he was there.” Just to back up a little
                bit on the story, it’s an odd sequence of events on why
                these two agents went onto the reservation to serve a
                warrant to begin with. What happened? There’s agents
                Coler and Williams. During the time between Wounded Knee
                siege in 1903 and this shootout in 1975, there is a
                buildup of federal law enforcement in and around the
                Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. It doesn’t make much
                sense. They’ve gone from agents you could count on one
                hand to dozens and dozens of agents in the area. The FBI
                was funding and providing intelligence and ammunition to
                a group of private militia, who were also Natives, run
                by a guy named Dick Wilson, called the GOON squad, the
                Guardians of the Oglala Nation. They were running
                business deals with the federal government against the
                wishes of the traditional Indians. So you had this
                powder keg in and around Pine Ridge Indian Reservation.
                And various members of AIM, the American Indian
                Movement, had been asked to come in, because over the
                period between 1973 and 1975, there have been 60
                murders. All of these people who had been murdered are
                either part of the traditional Indian group, were
                members of AIM or supportive of AIM. </p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>   </p>
              <p>That’s so scary. </p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong> </p>
              <p>Right, and they are scared. They’re afraid. People are
                being murdered and nobody is investigating. You have all
                these agents, they are not investigating a damn thing.
                So they’ve asked AIM to come in, because somebody has
                got to help them protect their families, protect their
                lands, protect their liberties. That’s why AIM is on the
                Pine Ridge Reservation to begin with. You’ve got a
                powder keg on your hands. There’s a guy named Jimmy
                Eagle who lives in the area, and Jimmy Eagle is wanted.
                One night he’s with some of his buddies, a couple of
                Caucasian ranch hands, a couple of his native friends,
                they’re all drinking together, they get into a fight,
                Jimmy Eagle steals one of the guy’s cowboy boots.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>   </p>
              <p>OK, so, boys being boys?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>   </p>
              <p>Yep. That will get you a federal warrant in that area.
                So Williams and Coler radio in that they have spotted a
                red pickup truck that fits the description of Jimmy
                Eagle’s pickup truck, and they’re going to go ahead and
                serve that warrant and pick him up for these boots.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>For these boots.</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>   </p>
              <p>Yep. </p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>OK. </p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>And so they follow him onto the ―</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>   </p>
              <p>FBI agents for some boots. OK.</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>This thing just smells. It smells. But setting all this
                aside, they radio and the radio transmissions aren’t
                recorded, they’re transcribed. What the transcripts tell
                you is they see the truck, “Looks like Jimmy Eagle’s.
                We’re going to go pick him up.” They drive onto the Pine
                Ridge Reservation. At the top of this hill there’s the
                Jumping Bull compound, where the AIM members, they’re
                living out there in tents and makeshift shelters up on
                the ridge. The pickup truck stops about 100 yards away
                down the bottom. And then a shootout starts. Up at the
                top of this hill is Leonard Peltier, Bob Robideau, and
                Dino Butler, the three guys who will eventually be
                charged with killing these agents. But at the bottom of
                this hill, a shootout begins. And there’s radio
                transmission that’s going back and forth. Coler and
                Williams are radioing in that they’re in trouble, they
                need help. Within a really short period of time this
                place is surrounded with federal agents. There’s a
                militia up there. There are BIA agents. There’s FBI,
                federal marshals. It’s like, “You got 100 people up
                there. How did you do this so quickly with two guys who
                were just following a pickup truck to arrest the guy for
                a pair of boots?” Setting that aside, that’s how this
                thing gets out of hand. But this shootout is happening
                and these two agents are killed. As other agents are
                coming to the property to help back up Coler and
                Williams, at least two of them pass a red pickup truck
                leaving the property. Now, I’m no FBI agent, but
                somebody follow the damn pickup truck! You know what
                you’re doing. You know what’s happened. You know they
                were following a red pickup truck. You know there’s a
                shootout, and you pass a red pickup truck. How about
                turn around and go find the pickup truck? But they
                don’t. They go and engage in this firefight. The issue
                becomes, “Who shot the agents?” The government’s theory
                was that it was these three guys. They came down the
                hill and at point blank range killed these two agents.
                There’s no evidence that that happened. After the
                shootout, the AIM members escape this area. Once the law
                enforcement sees that they’ve gotten away, there’s
                nobody shooting back at them, they go into the Jumping
                Bull compound and they destroy the place. They are mad.
                They go into houses and start shooting up family photos.
                It seems like some kind of Vietnam movie, where the
                company goes in after the Vietcong have left and set the
                village on fire. They tear the place up, but now they’ve
                escaped. They eventually catch Butler and Robideau. They
                try to get other Indians that were up there at the
                compound to testify against these guys, and nobody will
                tell them anything. They eventually focus on these three
                boys, one of whom is a kid named Norman Brown, but
                they’re 14, 15, 16-year-old boys, and they wear them out
                trying to get them to testify that they saw Peltier,
                Robideau, and Butler go down the hill to shoot these
                guys.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>   </p>
              <p>How old are these boys?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong></p>
              <p>Like 14, 15-years-old?</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>Oh, great. </p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>   </p>
              <p>Yeah, right. Right. And I’ve spoken to Norman Brown
                about that. What happened was, Norman, knowing that they
                are going to come question him about this, has consulted
                a lawyer, and the lawyer says, “Look, you have the right
                to counsel. I’m going to write on a piece of paper you
                have a lawyer, you are not going to speak to them
                without your lawyer present. Here’s his name and
                number.” And Norman had this little piece of paper.
                Well, the law enforcement convinces Norman’s mother that
                he needs to come down here and talk to them, because
                he’s facing life in prison himself for his role in this
                shootout. So his mother convinces Norman to go meet them
                at this little BIA shed. And he goes in and pulls the
                piece of paper out of his pocket, hands it to him. He
                says the guys laugh at him and throw the piece of paper
                into the trash. And then they grab him, throw him into a
                chair. They are now roughing him up. One of the agents
                sticks his foot between Norman’s knees, and leans into
                him with the agent’s knee into Norman’s throat, and
                starts to counsel him that he needs to get a better
                memory and he needs to start talking. And eventually,
                they get all three boys to say what they want them to
                say, which is, “We saw them.” They use that to get
                indictments. They pick up Robideau and Butler. Peltier
                has fled to Canada.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>How did he know that he was already being targeted by
                the FBI at this point?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>Well, because they had been there. He knows they’re all
                targets. They get their indictments, they pick up
                Robideau and Butler. Leonard is now in Canada, and they
                decide to try them separately, not wait to get Leonard
                extradited back. They try these two separately in Sioux
                Falls. Butler and Robideau are acquitted based on self
                defense. The theory is that, because of the violence
                that’s happening, it would not be unusual for members of
                the GOON squad to, if not kill somebody, to rough them
                up. The judge allows in all of the evidence about what
                became known as the <a
                  href="https://www.whoisleonardpeltier.info/home/background/reign/">reign
                  of terror</a>, where there was so much violence in the
                area, they knew that it was being backed by the FBI. And
                so when two guys in unmarked cars drive onto the
                compound with weapons, that a firefight was going to
                begin. And so the jury ruled that it was not
                unreasonable for the Indians to shoot back, and if
                somebody got killed, it was self defense. The U.S.
                Attorney and the FBI were furious. One of the things
                that also happened was, when the boys take the stand,
                they say, “Here’s what the FBI did to us. Here’s what
                the U.S. Attorney told me to say. That is not true.” So
                when you put that along with the reign of terror, these
                guys were acquitted. So now, all they’ve got left is
                Leonard Peltier. And there’s a memo from one of the
                supervisors, an internal high level memo that says,
                recognizing that Butler and Robideau have been
                acquitted, that they are to put the resources of the
                United States government into convicting Leonard
                Peltier. And that’s what they do. First thing they got
                to do is get Leonard back. And the Canadian government
                is saying, “You don’t have any evidence that he did
                this.” And so they come up with an affidavit from a
                woman named Myrtle Poor Bear. Myrtle Poor Bear says,
                “I’m Leonard’s girlfriend. I was there that day. I saw
                him do it.” They hand that to the Canadian court.
                Canadians go, “Well, Mr. Peltier, looks like they got
                evidence against you.” They send him back to stand
                trial. The case is transferred to Fargo, North Dakota
                and put in front of Judge Benson, and this judge says,
                “The FBI is not on trial here. We’re not letting in this
                evidence about the reign of terror.” He guts his
                self-defense defense. He’s not gonna let any of this
                evidence in. Myrtle Poor Bear, it turns out, never met
                Leonard Peltier. Did not know him. The FBI drafted this
                affidavit for her to sign. So Leonard is now here, under
                this affidavit where Myrtle just lied. Now Myrtle says
                that she did that because they told her if she did not
                sign it, that they were going to take her daughter away
                from her, which was a real threat. If you’re Indian, you
                know they’ve been doing this for a century with these
                Indian boarding schools. Leonard was literally pulled
                out of his grandmother’s arms when he was nine years old
                and sent to one of these boarding schools. When they
                tell Myrtle they’re going to take her daughter from her,
                that’s not an idle threat. And she’s scared and so she
                signs it. They were expecting her to testify at trial,
                and she said, “How am I going to know who he is?” And
                they said, “Don’t worry about it. We’re going to tell
                you everything you need to know.” This is according to
                Myrtle. So the stories are all contradictory. The U.S.
                Attorney, once these affidavits come out, there’s no way
                they can put her on the stand. But the defense wants to
                put her on the stand to show, similar to what they did
                with the boys, that they’re threatening witnesses. The
                court doesn’t let her take the stand. He says, “Because
                of her mental health issues, she’s incompetent to
                testify.” And so we never hear from Myrtle Poor Bear
                again. The other thing that happens is, now Norman Brown
                and his two friends have told the truth in the first
                trial, they’re going to take the stand in the second
                trial, but their testimony is going to be limited to
                what they saw, which was, “Yes, we saw these men up on
                the Jumping Bull compound and they were shooting,” which
                is true. There are the rules of evidence and what that
                allows you to do, if you’re the judge, is to put your
                finger on the scale. And there’s nothing anyone can do
                about it unless it’s so egregious that it can’t be
                ignored. I’ve talked to other judges about this. They
                know, if they want a case to come out a certain way,
                they can do it. “I can make decisions on what evidence
                gets in which evidence does not get in, and it can
                completely change the course of a trial.” And I’m
                reading these transcripts going, “Yep. That’s what’s
                happening here.”</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong></p>
              <p>Was there any physical evidence that they tried to
                bring to the table?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong> </p>
              <p>Their physical evidence was this: they examine the
                area, and they’re not finding anything that links
                Leonard to this shooting, but they go back, and after
                they’ve examined the area a couple of times, lo and
                behold, there’s a shell casing that they missed. They
                find a shell casing, and it’s sent to ballistics and
                their ballistics expert says, “The gun that we believe
                Leonard had, which was an AR-15, was damaged in a fire,
                so I couldn’t do a firing pin test, which would be the
                most accurate test I could do, but we did a shell casing
                examination, and the shell casing is consistent with
                this AR-15.” Leonard was the only person who had an
                AR-15. There you go. And that’s the argument that the
                U.S. Attorney makes. For all of the weeks of trial,
                their case really comes down to this. Let me add one
                other thing that happens. On day two of the trial, three
                women show up at the courthouse in Fargo. They’ve got a
                piece of paper, a handwritten note on a piece of
                notebook paper that says, “We are friends with one of
                the jurors. We work with her, and the other day we were
                on our coffee break, and she says to us, ‘I’m really
                prejudiced against Indians.’ This is what she said to
                us. We just couldn’t live with ourselves if we didn’t
                bring this to the court’s attention.” And so the court
                says, “Thank you very much. Let’s bring this jury in
                here. We need to find out what’s going on.” And so they
                bring the jury back in, and the judge says, “Hey, we’ve
                got this statement here. Let me know if you have any
                response.” She reads it, and she says, “Yep, I said it.
                But I told you when you were asking me questions that I
                would set any prejudice I had. I’d be fair.” The judge
                says, “Thank you very much.” That’s it. She is sent back
                to the jury. They allow this woman to sit on the jury,
                and she votes “guilt” at the end. Although, it’s hard to
                blame her if you’ve got a ballistics expert whose
                testimony has been, “Only one person had an AR-15.
                Here’s a shell casing from an AR-15.” It links Leonard
                to this point blank shooting. All well and good. But a
                Freedom of Information Act request years later produces
                another ballistics test. And the agent who was sitting
                on the stand that says, “We couldn’t do a firing pin
                test because the rifle had been destroyed,” had done a
                firing pin test. And it wasn’t that weapon. They knew
                it. They knew it wasn’t that weapon. They had done the
                ballistics test and they hid it. The other thing that
                the judge let in was, Leonard had been charged with
                attempted murder. Now what had happened there was, he
                was in a restaurant with some other guys. Plainclothes
                police officers had approached him and provoked him into
                a fight, and then claimed he had tried to murder them.
                Ordinarily, the judge in the Fargo trial wouldn’t let
                that in, because you’ve just been charged, you haven’t
                been convicted. What does that have to do with Pine
                Ridge? The judge let it in. “That would give him motive
                to kill the agents. I’m gonna let it in.” After he’s
                tried in Fargo, he’s tried for that attempted case. And
                he’s acquitted, because the girlfriend of one of the
                police officers admits that the whole thing was a setup.
                He was acquitted, but how that evidence gets in, that’s
                the problem. But once you get the ballistics test that
                was hidden, it becomes a clear Brady violation, which
                says it’s a Constitutional violation if the prosecution
                and law enforcement has exculpatory evidence and then
                they hid it. It should have been, “This conviction is
                set aside, but it wasn’t. The prosecutor now has zero
                evidence that put Leonard at the scene of the crime, if
                there was a crime. </p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>The other two guys had been acquitted.</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>   </p>
              <p>They’ve been acquitted based on self defense. So
                where’s the crime? So they changed their theory to
                aiding and abetting. </p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>It’s also odd to go after someone for aiding and
                abetting a first degree murder when you don’t have
                someone already charged with the first degree murder.</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>Right. Glen Crooks, the prosecutor, is asked that. “Who
                did he aid and abet?” And he said, I think it was his
                interview with Steve Croft, the 60 minutes reporter,
                Glenn Crooks says, “I don’t know. Maybe he aided and
                abetted himself.” You can’t aid and abet yourself, Mr.
                Crooks. I don’t know what law school you went to. That’s
                impossible. And the two guys that you indicted for it
                were acquitted based on self defense. So who did Leonard
                aid and abet? There’s nobody to aid and abet. This whole
                thing just stinks.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox </strong> </p>
              <p>So, a <a
href="https://open.spotify.com/show/3jHbjz5dkpn5Ts5nHWJwXp?si=4mznFHAZSiWRc6FNbs6k8Q">new
                  podcast</a> covering this case calls Leonard the
                longest serving political prisoner in American history.
                Why is that?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong></p>
              <p>I think there are two reasons why you could call him
                that. One is that AIM is listed as a subversive group by
                the FBI. They would use their counterintelligence not
                just watching groups they consider subversive, they’re
                actively doing things to interrupt them. It’s what
                caused so many FBI agents to be in the area. It’s what
                caused them to then support the GOON squad with
                intelligence and with ammunition. That was all politics.
                It’s all politics that have kept him in prison since
                then. When Bill Clinton was thinking about granting
                clemency to Leonard Peltier, Louis Freeh, who was
                director of the FBI, went on a full out lobbying
                campaign to stop that. James Comey did the same thing
                when President Obama was there. That’s politics. And
                they’re keeping a man in prison for politics. He needs
                to be sent home. He’ll be 76-years-old in September.
                What they did was a travesty. It’s time to end this.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox </strong> </p>
              <p>Why are the FBI so hung up on this?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>  </p>
              <p>Because it’s personal. These were two FBI agents and
                the FBI stake their reputation on it. They cannot let it
                go. They put the entire resources of the United States
                government in getting a conviction of Leonard Peltier.
                And they cannot say, “We were wrong.” It’s the same
                thing with the protests in the streets. Until the police
                are willing to say, when mistakes are made, “Yes, we did
                it. We accept the responsibility, and we’re going to do
                better.” Until they do, it creates an us versus them.
                And it’s not an us versus them. It’s us. It’s all us. </p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>   </p>
              <p>Leonard is turning 76 this September. We are in the
                midst of a pandemic. How is he surviving the situation
                right now? </p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong></p>
              <p>He’s down in Coleman maximum security prison. It is
                essentially a perpetual lockdown. You might as well be
                in solitary, and they get out three hours a week. And
                during that time there, they will have to shower and
                make their phone calls, head to the commissary, get
                those things done, maybe get on a computer and send an
                email. You get 10 minutes for your phone call. It’s
                nerve wracking. But it’s interesting, I’m learning so
                much about the native culture. Leonard has the same way
                of thinking in the long term. It has been 44 years, he
                always has hope that at some point, and now we’re hoping
                that it’s President Trump, will say, “Enough is enough.
                Go back to Turtle Mountain.” He’s got a little place to
                live up there. “Go up there, paint, become an elder in
                your tribe, and live out what time you have left.”
                That’s the way he thinks, and that’s what we’re doing.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong>  </p>
              <p>So as much as Leonard Peltier has become a FBI
                boogeyman, he’s become an icon for the native community,
                for AIM. Is Leonard still active in that community? Does
                he still have roots in his community? And if so, how
                does he express them?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong> </p>
              <p>He’s able to send emails. He’s able to talk to people
                in the community who can bring back his messages. But
                when he went to Pine Ridge in 1975, he went there as a
                warrior for his people, because you can’t separate the
                people from the land and their culture. That’s still the
                way he is today. He’s moved from a warrior status to an
                elder status. It’s still about the tribes. It’s about
                the land. It’s about the environment. It’s about the
                kids. He’s got 12, 13 great grandchildren. When you
                think in terms of generations, and in terms of
                centuries, you don’t turn inward and just think about
                yourself or “Poor me,” or “How long are they going to do
                this to me?” They may do it forever. I’m hopeful that it
                won’t happen that way. That at least he’s got some time
                left, but his health is not great. He still keeps his
                spirits up. His painting helps to do that. Those are the
                things that he does to stay connected to those of us on
                the outside and more importantly to his land and his
                people. Really impressive guy. I would love for him to
                get out so that people could see the guy that I see.</p>
              <p><strong>Amanda Knox</strong> </p>
              <p>Do you have any final thoughts before I let you go?</p>
              <p><strong>Kevin Sharp</strong>   </p>
              <p>I would love for people to know that these things
                happen. Our government is capable of this. But they’re
                also capable of fixing it. Until we’re ready to talk
                about it, and face it, we can’t end it.</p>
            </div>
          </div>
        </div>
      </div>
      <div> </div>
    </div>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      Freedom Archives
      522 Valencia Street
      San Francisco, CA 94110
      415 863.9977
      <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="https://freedomarchives.org/">https://freedomarchives.org/</a></div>
  </body>
</html>