<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <h2><a
href="http://sfbayview.com/2015/12/jesse-perez-prevails-prison-guards-found-liable-for-retaliatory-abuse-of-californias-solitary-confinement-policies/"
        title="Jesse Perez prevails: Prison guards found liable for
        retaliatory abuse of California’s solitary confinement policies">Jesse
        Perez prevails: Prison guards found liable for retaliatory abuse
        of California’s solitary confinement policies</a></h2>
    <div class="date">December 14, 2015<br>
      <b><small><small><small><small><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://sfbayview.com/2015/12/jesse-perez-prevails-prison-guards-found-liable-for-retaliatory-abuse-of-californias-solitary-confinement-policies/">http://sfbayview.com/2015/12/jesse-perez-prevails-prison-guards-found-liable-for-retaliatory-abuse-of-californias-solitary-confinement-policies/</a></small></small></small></small></b><br>
    </div>
    <div class="social4i" style="height:69px;">
      <div class="social4in" style="height:69px;float: left;">
        <div class="socialicons s4fblike"
          style="float:left;margin-right: 10px;">
          <div style="display: block;" class="fb-like"
data-href="http://sfbayview.com/2015/12/jesse-perez-prevails-prison-guards-found-liable-for-retaliatory-abuse-of-californias-solitary-confinement-policies/"
            data-send="false" data-layout="box_count" data-width="55"
            data-height="62" data-show-faces="false"><strong><em><br>
                by Jesse Perez</em></strong><em><br>
              <br>
              San Francisco, Dec. 13, 2015</em> – In what amounts to an
            improbable plaintiff victory, a federal jury unanimously
            found several Pelican Bay State Prison guards liable for
            retaliating against a prisoner in solitary confinement for
            successfully exercising his first amendment right to file a
            prior lawsuit against other guards. In the case, I was the
            prisoner plaintiff alleging that after favorably litigating
            a near decade‐long federal suit challenging my placement in
            Pelican Bay’s harsh isolation unit as a “gang associate,”
            the guard defendants conspired to retaliate and did
            retaliate against me.</div>
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
    <div id="attachment_59641" style="width: 410px" class="wp-caption
      alignright"><br>
      <br>
      <br>
      <br>
      <br>
      <br>
      <br>
    </div>
    <p>The guards’ unlawful conduct, I claimed, was also spurred by my
      participation in peaceful civil disobedience actions that included
      the 2011 and 2013 California prisoners’ hunger strikes as well as
      my authoring <a href="http://sfbayview.com/?s=Jesse+Perez">articles</a>
      critical of the department’s solitary housing policies and
      advocating for the scaling up of prisoners’ engagement in the
      public political process.</p>
    <p>The retaliation at issue in the case was exacted in various
      forms. Specifically, I accused the guards of stripping me naked,
      trashing my cell, improperly taking legal documents relevant to my
      prior lawsuit (ongoing at the time), vocalizing threats about
      pursuing lawsuits against department employees and falsifying a
      disciplinary report with a gang nexus intended to keep me in
      solitary longer.</p>
    <p>In defending against the lawsuit, the defendants – all guards
      assigned to the gang squad at Pelican Bay – denied the retaliatory
      accusations and argued that they were merely “following orders”
      and “standard procedures.”</p>
    <p>On the stand, however, the factual testimony, spurious safety
      issues, ignorance asserted of the regulations governing their acts
      and rationalizations trotted in support of their defense contained
      gripping inconsistencies, inherent incredibility and were
      ultimately unpersuasive – at best.</p>
    <h3 style="text-align: center;"><span style="color: #800000;">I
        accused the guards of stripping me naked, trashing my cell,
        improperly taking legal documents relevant to my prior lawsuit
        (ongoing at the time), vocalizing threats about pursuing
        lawsuits against department employees and falsifying a
        disciplinary report with a gang nexus intended to keep me in
        solitary longer.</span></h3>
    <p>Following the parties’ decision to rest their respective cases, a
      gender‐balanced jury of eight – acting in their fact‐finding role
      – retreated to deliberate for two days. After considering the
      evidence and counsels’ arguments, the unanimous verdict returned
      was against several of the guard defendants.</p>
    <p>The jury saw plenty of evidence to convince them that the guards’
      actions were not the bumbling creature of ignorance and error –
      but, rather, the well‐designed and malicious strategy to retaliate
      against me for pursuing constitutionally protected legal action in
      court contesting my placement in isolation.</p>
    <p>While prisons are ultimately about public safety, this case lifts
      the cloak of secrecy to provide a rare window for the public to
      see how the department’s Institutional Gang Investigators (IGI)
      violate the public’s trust and abuse the practice of solitary
      confinement in which the state continues to engage.</p>
    <p>The large number of prisoners released from isolation since the
      class action Ashker v. Brown was settled also reflects the IGI’s
      heavy handed influence in placing and retaining prisoners there
      under the now discredited and empty rhetoric of safety and
      security.</p>
    <p>There is also a compelling underlying truth here, I believe. What
      was proven at trial is necessarily emblematic of a deeper
      pathology existing within the California Department of Corrections
      and Rehabilitation, one pointing unerringly to the sheer
      inefficiency of the “leadership” of the agency’s administration,
      and the public frankly deserves better.</p>
    <p>This is particularly so when prison officials willingly violate
      the constitution and refuse to remedy those violations, instead
      choosing to engage in protracted litigation – which only results
      in greater cost for taxpayers.</p>
    <p>This alone is basis to ratchet up the tempo in the growing
      drum‐beat calling for substantive reforms to the state’s
      correctional system.</p>
    <h3 style="text-align: center;"><span style="color: #800000;">The
        large number of prisoners released from isolation since the
        class action Ashker v. Brown was settled also reflects the IGI’s
        heavy handed influence in placing and retaining prisoners there
        under the now discredited and empty rhetoric of safety and
        security.</span></h3>
    <p>The plaintiff’s prevailing case was presented at trial by the
      outstanding team from the WilmerHale law firm, attorneys Randall
      Lee, Matt Benedetto and Katie Moran. They were assisted in its
      preparation by Jessica Lewis and Tiffany Tejada‐Rodriguez as well
      as other incredible support staff that contributed to the
      favorable outcome.</p>
    <p><em>Send our brother some love and light: Jesse Perez, K</em><em>‐42186,
        PBSP A5-106, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City CA 95532.</em>
    </p>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      Freedom Archives
      522 Valencia Street
      San Francisco, CA 94110
      415 863.9977
      <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.freedomarchives.org">www.freedomarchives.org</a>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>