<html>
  <head>

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <header id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_797" class="header">
      <header id="a-headers">
        <h1 id="a-header" itemprop="headline">Lori Berenson returns to
          New York City after spending almost 20 years in a Peruvian
          jail on charges she aided Marxist rebels </h1>
        <div id="a-byline"> BY <a rel="author"
            href="http://www.nydailynews.com/authors?author=Laura-Bult"
            itemscope="" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person">Laura Bult</a>,
          <a rel="author"
            href="http://www.nydailynews.com/authors?author=Ginger-Adams-Otis"
            itemscope="" itemtype="http://schema.org/Person">Ginger
            Adams Otis</a> </div>
        <div id="a-credits"><b><small><small><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/lori-berenson-back-nyc-20-year-peru-jail-stint-article-1.2454311">http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/lori-berenson-back-nyc-20-year-peru-jail-stint-article-1.2454311</a></small></small></b></div>
        <div id="a-date-published" content="2015-12-03T15:19:08">Thursday,
          December 3, 2015, 3:19 PM</div>
      </header>
      <div class="a-module video">
        <div class="a-video"> </div>
      </div>
      <p> After nearly 20 years in a Peruvian jail on terrorism-related
        charges, Lori Berenson returned to New York a free woman
        Thursday.</p>
      <p> The 46-year-old was all smiles as <a
href="http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/activist-lori-berenson-headed-home-peru-jail-sentence-article-1.2450538"
          target="_blank">she walked through JFK airport with her uncle</a>
        — even after a four-hour interrogation at customs.</p>
      <p> “I just want to say I'm very grateful for the interest and I'm
        not going to be giving any further declarations,” Berenson said.</p>
      <p> “I'm very grateful to all the people who've helped over the
        years and I'm glad to be with my family,” she added.</p>
      <p> Her 6-year-old son Salvador — who was born behind bars in Peru
        — traveled with her on the overnight flight.</p>
      <p> He left the airport ahead of Berenson with her parents,
        college professors Rhoda and Mark Berenson.</p>
      <p> Berenson spent the last five years living quietly in Lima with
        her son after Peruvian authorities paroled her in 2010.</p>
      <p> She was able to make a brief visit home a year later but then
        was barred from leaving Peru again until her full 20-year
        sentence elapsed.</p>
      <p> Her uncle, Ken Berenson, 70, came from Mt. Vernon to greet his
        niece and keep her company as she waited for customs to give her
        clearance to re-enter the U.S.</p>
      <p> “I'm feeling great about seeing my niece, it's a 20-year wait
        for her freedom, so I'm very upbeat about that,” he said.</p>
      <p> He said his niece was “enthusiastic” about beginning a fresh
        life with her son in New York City.</p>
      <p> She planned to stay with her parents in their Kips Bay
        apartment until she got settled.</p>
      <p> Last year Berenson completed an online sociology degree from
        the City University of New York.</p>
      <p> “My objective is to continue to work in social justice issues,
        in a different capacity obviously,” she told the Associated
        Press.</p>
      <p> Her uncle said a big family reunion was in the works.</p>
      <p> “She's coming to my house over the weekend for a party,” he
        said.</p>
      <p> He said he was relieved to have his niece home — and through
        U.S. customs.</p>
      <p> “I’d imagine they have a lot of questions for her,” he said,
        about the lengthy wait for his niece to be processed.</p>
      <p> Berenson was a student at the Massachusetts Institute of
        Technology in Cambridge, Mass., when she dropped out in the
        early 1990s to travel to Latin America.</p>
      <p> While there she worked to support leftist rebels and in 1994
        went to Peru, where she got involved with the Tupac Amaru
        Revolutionary Movement.</p>
      <p> Berenson has always denied knowing about the group’s plot in
        1995 to storm the Peruvian congress and kidnap lawmakers.</p>
      <p> But when the plot failed, she was rounded up along with the
        rebel leader’s wife and convicted of “collaborating with
        terrorism.”</p>
      <p> She had rented and was living in the safe house used by the
        Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement as it prepared to raid
        Congress.</p>
      <p> Berenson was sent to a barebones Peruvian prison high in the
        Andes, at 12,700 feet.</p>
      <p> The altitude affected her health and eventually — after
        pressure from U.S. officials — she was moved and later allowed
        to live in Lima.</p>
      <p> As she and her son Salvador left Peru Wednesday night — ringed
        by police — some people shouted “Get out of here, terrorist!”</p>
      <p> In a text message to the Associated Press, Berenson said the
        experience was “incredibly surreal although entirely typical.”</p>
      <h1 id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_796" class="headline">_________________________________<br>
      </h1>
      <h1 id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_796" class="headline">After
        20-year sentence in Peru, Lori Berenson returns to New York</h1>
    </header>
    <div class="credit-bar clearfix large-sharebtns"><b><small><small><small><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://news.yahoo.com/20-sentence-peru-lori-berenson-returns-york-201253816.html">http://news.yahoo.com/20-sentence-peru-lori-berenson-returns-york-201253816.html</a></small></small></small></b><br>
    </div>
    <p>By Eduardo Munoz and Mauricio Ramirez</p>
    <div class="body-slot-mod">
      <div class="yom-remote">
        <div class="" id="mediacontentrelatedstory_container">
        </div>
      </div>
    </div>
    <p> NEW YORK (Reuters) - New Yorker Lori Berenson, who was convicted
      of aiding leftist rebels in Peru 20 years ago, returned to her
      hometown on Thursday.</p>
    <p id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_1072"> Berenson, 46, emerged from
      a terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport and said she
      was glad to be home after finishing a 20-year sentence for
      supporting the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement, or MRTA, a
      guerilla group that was active in the 1980s and 1990s. </p>
    <p> “I’m very grateful to everyone who’s helped me, and I’m happy to
      be with my family,” said Berenson, who was casually dressed with
      her hair pulled back in a ponytail. She declined further comment.</p>
    <p id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_1075"> Berenson's attorney Anibal
      Apari said on Tuesday that she would be traveling with her
      6-year-old son, Salvador, who was born while she in a Peruvian
      prison. Apari is the boy's father. Berenson left the airport in a
      private car and the boy's whereabouts were not known. </p>
    <p id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_1078"> Apari, a former member of
      MRTA, and Berenson met in 1997 while they were both in prison.</p>
    <div class="body-related">The daughter of college professors from
      Manhattan, Berenson had left her studies at Massachusetts
      Institute of Technology and went to Latin America to support
      leftist movements. She is among a number of people in Peru
      finishing sentences for crimes linked to the country's civil war,
      in which an estimated 69,000 people died. </div>
    <p> Berenson was convicted of supporting MRTA but was never
      convicted of participating in violent acts. </p>
    <p id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_1098"> A military tribunal
      sentenced her to life in prison under counter terrorism laws, but
      she was retried in a civilian court and her sentence was reduced
      after pressure from her parents, human rights groups and the U.S.
      government.</p>
    <p id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_1082"> She served 15 years in
      prison, part of it in solitary confinement, and the past five
      years on parole.</p>
    <p id="yui_3_18_1_1_1449243699919_1086"> Berenson and her son had
      come to the United States in 2011, but returned to Peru after
      authorities there passed a law barring foreigners convicted of
      terrorism-related crimes from travel.</p>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      Freedom Archives
      522 Valencia Street
      San Francisco, CA 94110
      415 863.9977
      <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.freedomarchives.org">www.freedomarchives.org</a>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>