<html>
<body>
<h1><font size=4><b>US fugitive cites poor health in extradition
fight</b></font></h1><font size=3>By BARRY HATTON - Associated Press |
Oct. 28, 2011<br><br>
<a href="http://news.yahoo.com/us-fugitive-cites-poor-health-extradition-fight-194500200.html" eudora="autourl">
http://news.yahoo.com/us-fugitive-cites-poor-health-extradition-fight-194500200.html<br>
<br>
</a>ALMOCAGEME, Portugal  The wife of captured American fugitive
Geoorge<br>
Wright said Friday her husband has a litany of health problems
requiring<br>
treatment and should not be extradited to the United States to serve
the<br>
rest of his time on a murder conviction after 41 years on the
lam.<br><br>
Maria do Rosario Valente said in an interview with The Associated Press
at<br>
their home that Wright suffers from glaucoma, "very, very high"
blood<br>
pressure caused by recent stress, and has complained of chest pains.
She<br>
also said he regrets his criminal past.<br><br>
"We're having a bunch of tests done to see what's his current
health<br>
condition," Valente said.<br><br>
She added: "He regrets the choices he ... made. If he could,
probably he'd<br>
have made different choices."<br><br>
Wright, tall and slim with his head shaved bald, did not participate
in<br>
the interview because of Portuguese court restrictions that prevent
him<br>
from talking about the case. After it was over, he kissed her and
made<br>
small talk about matters unrelated to his legal battle.<br><br>
Wright's lawyer, Manuel Luis Ferreira, said he will include his
client's<br>
health problems in legal arguments aimed at preventing him from being
sent<br>
to the United States to serve the rest of a 15- to 30-year jail
sentence<br>
for the 1962 killing of a New Jersey gas station worker.<br><br>
"I didn't initially realize how bad off he was," Ferreira told
the AP<br>
Friday. "Now that I've gotten to know him, I know his
problems."<br><br>
U.S. Justice Department spokeswoman Laura Sweeney declined comment
via<br>
email on what impact Wright's health could have on the extradition<br>
process, which could last months.<br><br>
Wright, 68, was convicted of the murder of Walter Patterson in Wall<br>
Township, N.J... He escaped from the Bayside State Prison in Leesburg,
New<br>
Jersey, in 1970 after serving more than seven years. The FBI says
says<br>
Wright also was part of a Black Liberation Army group that hijacked a
U.S.<br>
plane from Detroit Metropolitan Airport to Algeria in 1972.<br><br>
The rest of the group was arrested in France, but Wright made his way
to<br>
Portugal, and met Valente in the late 1970s in Portugal. The two
later<br>
moved to the tiny West African nation of Guinea-Bissau, a former<br>
Portuguese colony, where the country's then-Marxist leaders granted
him<br>
asylum and a new identity.<br><br>
Wright lived openly using his real name in Guinea-Bissau and even<br>
socialized with American diplomats, but one former ambassador who
served<br>
in the country while Wright and other U.S. diplomats were based there
has<br>
told the AP they did not know about his past.<br><br>
His wife worked for years as a freelance translator for the U.S.
embassy<br>
in the country's capital, Bissau, and Wright was a logistics
coordinator<br>
for a Belgian nonprofit development group until the couple moved back
to<br>
Portugal in 1993.<br><br>
Valente said her husband has become a more peaceful man since his days
as<br>
a militant. She showed the AP photographs of paintings by Wright and
art<br>
work at local buildings  a skill which has allowed him to earn mmoney
in<br>
Portugal among other odd jobs he's done over the years.<br><br>
She spoke to the AP in English in the kitchen of the home she has
shared<br>
with Wright for almost since they left Guinea-Bissau, at the end of
a<br>
cobblestone street in a pretty hamlet on the Atlantic coast near a<br>
stunning beach and about 40 kilometers (25 miles) from the
Portuguese<br>
capital of Lisbon.<br><br>
The FBI says it requested Wright's detention after providing
fingerprints<br>
to Portuguese authorities that matched his contained in a national<br>
fingerprint database for all citizens and residents. He was
initially<br>
jailed, but a judge allowed him to return home wearing an electronic
tag<br>
that monitors his movements and would alert authorities if he
ventures<br>
outside his house.<br><br>
Neighbors describe Wright as a friendly, churchgoing family man. He has
a<br>
grown daughter and son with Valente. Some assumed he was from Africa
when<br>
he moved here.<br><br>
"If ... the purpose of sending someone to jail is to rehabilitate
them,<br>
then that job is done," Valente said.<br><br>
The main argument from Wright's lawyer for him to stay in Portugal is
his<br>
Portuguese citizenship  and a law from the country that allows
PPortuguese<br>
convicted of crimes to serve their time at home.<br><br>
The citizenship is based on his new identity from Guinea-Bissau, and
the<br>
name he was given: "Jose Luis Jorge dos Santos."<br><br>
Armed with that, he married Valente in 1990, and used his new identity
and<br>
the marriage to convince Portuguese authorities to give him
citizenship.<br><br>
Ann Patterson, daughter of the man killed in New Jersey, declined
comment<br>
Friday on Wright's health problems but said she still wants him
returned<br>
to serve his sentence.<br><br>
"Our world has been turned upside down," said Patterson, 63.
"We've now<br>
had to grieve for our father for the second time when we never should
have<br>
had to the first time."<br><br>
____<br><br>
AP reporter Geoff Mulvihill in Haddonfield, N.J., contributed to this
report.<br><br>
<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#008000">415 863-9977<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#0000FF">
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.Freedomarchives.org</a></font><font size=3> </font></body>
</html>