<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
</font><font face="comic sans ms" size=2 color="#330099">
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/">
http://unprison.wordpress.com/</a></font><font size=3> <br>
</font><h2><font size=5 color="#330099"><b>
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/2011/03/21/formerly-incarcerated-convicted-peoples-movement-arises/">
Formerly</a>
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/2011/03/21/formerly-incarcerated-convicted-peoples-movement-arises/">
 Incarcerated & Convicted People’s Movement
Arises!</a></b></font></h2>
<font face="comic sans ms" size=2 color="#330099">Posted on
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/2011/03/21/formerly-incarcerated-convicted-peoples-movement-arises/">
March 21, 2011</a> by
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/author/bruha554/">Bruce
Reilly</a><br><br>
Alabama represents the answer to a clarion call.  This is a call
that<br>
speaks to us in our own voice; clear, loud and urgent.  A voice
that<br>
speaks to our identity and emanates from the soul, ringing true both<br>
in the head and the heart.  Our objective is a collective one,<br>
continuing in that vein, as we gathered fifty people from across the<br>
nation to engage in a conversation about the need to build a
Formerly<br>
Incarcerated and Convicted People’s Movement.  We understand
and<br>
declare very clearly: the criminal justice system does NOT work. 
It<br>
is no more than a destructive force in our communities now and for<br>
future generations.<br><br>
Fifty formerly incarcerated and convicted organizers came with a<br>
dedication and commitment stating that this was our time.  We were
not<br>
deterred by our inability to raise the entire budget to fly, feed
and<br>
house people in Alabama for three days, nor were the few dozen<br>
supporters who found their own means to be
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imyYAz-uoOk">present for this
historic<br>
moment</a>.  As activists, we have been to our share of conferences
and<br>
rallies, yet before many of us left our homes, we knew this
invitation<br>
was different.  And we readily subsidized our own fight for<br>
restoration of our own civil and human rights.<br><br>
The first exercise was to introduce ourselves to each other not
simply<br>
by our names or the many great struggles that we were currently<br>
engaged in, but by who we embraced as our heroes.  We wrote our
names<br>
and the name of our hero on a piece of paper and we taped those to
the<br>
front of the table where we sat.  We were quickly able to see
the<br>
right people were in the room.  We participated in designing a<br>
historical time line and this practice drew us closer to discovering<br>
our common history, something uniquely ours as incarcerated,
formerly<br>
incarcerated and convicted people.  Knowing where we came from made
it<br>
easier to find our vision.  We agreed to accept as our vision
“The<br>
Fight for the Full Restoration of Our Civil and Human Rights.”<br><br>
The concept and construction of a movement requires a vessel large<br>
enough to hold us all, and steering a vessel of this scale requires
a<br>
crew of many navigators and leaders.  Agreeing on a vision was
an<br>
essential and amazing accomplishment in light of the fact that time<br>
was short, and with so many leaders in the room egos could easily
have<br>
gotten in the way.  We agreed to maintain the structure that
propelled<br>
us to this point.  However, we needed to enlarge the
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/formerly-incarcerated-peoples-movement/">
steering<br>
committee</a> to seriously consider setting a national agenda. 
Twenty<br>
people volunteered to join the steering committee, providing us<br>
greater diversity in both geography and gender.  We decided we
would<br>
do regular conference calls to move forward with the agenda and<br>
coordinating the Los Angeles convening.<br><br>
The Steering Committee planned to kick off the beginning of this<br>
Movement by walking across the Edmund Pettus Bridge, in Selma. 
Days<br>
before any of us hopped in a plane, bus, train, or car, we were<br>
informed that we would have stay on the sidewalk if we were going to<br>
march across the bridge.  Over 247 people called the mayor of
Selma<br>
and let him know we were coming to
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cq9GX9wxdr0">march over the
bridge</a>, and not on<br>
the sidewalk.  Some of us consciously considered going to jail
again,<br>
and some of us even emptied our bank accounts just in case we needed<br>
bail.  We didn’t anticipate Mayor George Evans of Selma would ask
to<br>
speak with us after our march, or agree to read our statement at the<br>
46-year Jubilee marking Bloody Sunday.  Nor did we anticipate that
our<br>
march across the bridge would be
<a href="http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/article/20110303/NEWS01/103030314/Group-of-formerly-incarcerated-people-visit-area-discuss-prison-reform">
headlines on one of the largest<br>
papers in Alabama</a>, with over twenty photos online.  Our own
Tina<br>
Reynolds was photographed carrying a sign proclaiming that
“Democracy<br>
Starts At Home.”  We should be allowed to vote and exercise our
civil<br>
rights regardless of where we live in the United States.<br><br>
Our visit to the state capital in Montgomery is a testament to the<br>
power of unity.  While standing on the stairs of the Capital
building<br>
we were introduced to, and had a short conversation with, Alabama<br>
Chief Justice Sue Cobb-Bell. The Chief Justice explained the serious<br>
effort underway to rewrite the criminal code and reduce the prison<br>
population by 3,000.  Once inside, we were led into a conference
room<br>
where we met Rep. John Rogers, the head of the Alabama Black Caucus.<br>
After a spirited discussion about pressing issues, we were
ultimately<br>
promised a community forum of which we would take part in choosing
the<br>
community organizations to participate.  We were also promised
that<br>
key elected officials, including the governor, would be present at
the<br>
forum.<br><br>
We would be remiss if we did not acknowledge the work and support
that<br>
our host organization, The Ordinary People Society (TOPS), put into<br>
our initial organizing.  On a side note: TOPS was seriously
respected<br>
by prominent members of the Alabama legislature, who pledged their<br>
support to this struggle, and prominent officials in both Selma and<br>
Montgomery.  Meanwhile, our
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qfcaa7Rlzp0">Allies</a> were
honing their own efforts, such<br>
as supporting those organizations on our side (and inspiring those
who<br>
should be), and creating more
<a href="http://blackagendareport.com/content/first-national-meeting-formerly-incarcerated-convenes-alabama">
spaces for our voices to be heard</a>.  They<br>
are committed to recognizing our priorities and helping us create
the<br>
tools for our organizing efforts.<br><br>
Last but not least, we want to thank everyone who attended and
wrapped<br>
their heads around the bigger picture of Movement and a larger<br>
agenda.  As a collective
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s8P6hdjRQA4&feature=related">
we all committed to something bigger</a> than<br>
each of our own organizations or individual work.  We took action
and<br>
decided to organize through Regions represented by our expanded<br>
Steering Committee.  Regional caucuses will facilitate closer<br>
collaboration in our areas, and we will build a movement on one<br>
accord, as a collective committed to “The Fight for Full Restoration<br>
of our Civil and Human Rights”.  Let us keep moving forward, and
share<br>
this document with people we believe should know and participate in<br>
our common efforts to build a Movement.  Let people know about
the<br>
goal to meet in Los Angeles- November 2nd, 2011.<br><br>
We have recognized these dates/weeks for actions, meetings, and<br>
solidarity. We call on our members to take part in order to raise
our<br>
capacity, profile, and build a Movement:<br>
March 29th<br>
April 23rd<br>
May 21st
(<a href="http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=40.8119444444,-73.9633333333&spn=0.01,0.01&q=40.8119444444,-73.9633333333%20%28Riverside%20Church%29&t=h">
Riverside Church</a>), May 28th (Solidarity w/
<a href="http://unprison.wordpress.com/2010/12/21/sign-the-petition-of-solidarity-with-georgia-prisoners/">
Georgia Prison<br>
Strike</a>)<br>
June 17th
(<a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ethan-nadelmann/post_1717_b_821935.html">
40th Anniversary of Drug War</a>)<br>
Aug. 21st
(<a href="http://www.pslweb.org/liberationnews/news/09-08-21-tribute-to-comrade-george-lester.html">
40th Anniversary of San Quentin Uprising</a>)<br>
Sept. 29th
(<a href="http://socialistworker.org/2011/03/17/legacy-of-the-attica-rebellion">
40th Anniversary of Attica Rebellion</a>).<br><br>
On June 23rd-26th is the <a href="http://alliedmedia.org/">Allied Media
Conference</a> in Detroit.  There is<br>
an entire track of workshops focused on the Prison Industrial
Complex,<br>
and members of the FICPM will be participating.  This is an
excellent<br>
opportunity for those who can attend.<br><br>
Sincerely,<br>
Formerly Incarcerated & Convicted People’s Movement Steering
Committee<br><br>
</font><h6><b>Related Articles</b></h6>
<ul>
<li><font face="comic sans ms" size=2 color="#330099">
<a href="http://criminaljustice.change.org/blog/view/formerly_incarcerated_activists_spearheading_a_new_civil_rights_movement">
Formerly Incarcerated Activists Spearheading a New Civil Rights
Movement</a>(<a href="http://criminaljustice.change.org">
criminaljustice.change.org</a>) </font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>

</ul><font size=3><br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#FF0000">Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#008000">415 863-9977<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#0000FF">
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.Freedomarchives.org</a></font><font size=3> </font></body>
</html>