<html>
<body>
<h1><font size=4><b>FBI raids anti-war activists' homes<br>
Agents looking for links to terrorists, federal spokesman
says</b></font></h1><font size=3>September 24, 2010|By Andy Grimm and
Cynthia Dizikes, Tribune reporters<br>
</font><font size=1>
<a href="http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-09-24/news/ct-met-fbi-terrorism-investigation-20100924_1_fbi-agents-anti-war-activists-federal-agents" eudora="autourl">
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2010-09-24/news/ct-met-fbi-terrorism-investigation-20100924_1_fbi-agents-anti-war-activists-federal-agents<br>
<br>
</a></font><font size=3>Federal agents searched homes of anti-war
activists in Chicago and Minneapolis on Friday in an investigation of
possible links with terrorist organizations in the Middle East and South
America.<br><br>
About 20 FBI agents spent most of the day searching the Logan Square
residence of activists Stephanie Weiner and Joseph Iosbaker, Weiner
said.<br><br>
In Jefferson Park, neighbors saw FBI agents carrying boxes from the
apartment of community activist Hatem Abudayyeh, executive director of
the Arab American Action Network. In addition, Chicago activist Thomas
Burke said he was served a grand jury subpoena that requested records of
any payments to Abudayyeh or his group.<br><br>
"The warrants are seeking evidence in support of an ongoing Joint
Terrorism Task Force investigation into activities concerning the
material support of terrorism," said Steve Warfield, spokesman for
the FBI in Minneapolis, where six additional homes were searched
Friday.<br><br>
Warfield said no arrests had been made and that there was no
"imminent danger" to the public.<br><br>
Ross Rice, an FBI spokesman in Chicago, gave the two Chicago blocks where
agents had searched homes Friday, but he declined to name the
targets.<br><br>
Melinda Power, an attorney for Weiner and Iosbaker and a longtime friend,
said agents took about 30 boxes of papers dating to the 1970s, including
a postcard from an old girlfriend of Iosbaker's.<br><br>
"They said they would determine what was evidence later," Power
said.<br><br>
Weiner, who said she and her husband for years have been active in labor
causes and the anti-war movement, complained the search was an attempt to
intimidate her and other activists.<br><br>
"We aren't doing anything differently than we have in 20
years," said Weiner, a teacher at Wilbur Wright College. Iosbaker is
a staff member at the University of Illinois at Chicago and a union
steward for Service Employees International Union Local 73.<br><br>
Burke said he received a grand jury subpoena requesting records of
payments to Abudayyeh's organization as well as two groups among the
State Department's list of foreign terrorist organizations, the Popular
Front for the Liberation of Palestine and the Revolutionary Armed Forces
of Colombia (FARC).<br><br>
The subpoena also requested "items relating to trips to Colombia,
Jordan, Syria, the Palestinian territories of Israel." Burke said he
toured Colombia eight years ago with members of an oil workers union
there.<br><br>
Burke, a former school custodian-turned-stay-at-home father, belongs to
the Freedom Road Socialist Organization, a group mentioned in subpoenas
and search warrants issued Friday to activists in Minneapolis.<br><br>
Burke said he knows Weiner, Iosbaker and Abudayyeh from years of
involvement in demonstrations and activities in Chicago. Most of the
people whose homes were searched or who were issued subpoenas attended
anti-war rallies at the 2008 Republican National Convention in St. Paul,
Minn., he said.<br><br>
In a statement issued on behalf of the activists, Minneapolis activist
Steff Yorek said the homes of a number of anti-war, socialist or
pro-Palestinian groups had been searched by the FBI.<br><br>
Yorek, whose home was also searched Friday, called the searches "an
outrageous fishing expedition."<br><br>
"Activists have the right not to speak with the FBI and are
encouraged to politely refuse," she said.<br><br>
Several of those targeted with warrants or subpoenas are also occasional
contributors to Fight Back!, a socialist newsletter that is generally
supportive of leftist groups and critical of U.S. "wars of
occupation" in Iraq and Afghanistan, Burke said.<br><br>
"We pretty much all know each other," Burke said. "We
barely have money to publish our magazine. We might write about
(revolutionary groups) favorably, but as for giving them material aid,
nothing."<br><br>
Weiner and Iosbaker were also subpoenaed to appear before a federal grand
jury in Chicago on Oct. 5, Power said.<br><br>
Not long after the FBI agents left, a group of about 20 demonstrators
gathered outside the couple's home, carrying signs and singing "Give
Peace a Chance."<br><br>
Sarah Simmons, 51, held a piece of paper printed with a peace sign. She
said she had known the couple for 15 years. "I think this is
outrageous," she said.<br><br>
<i>agrimm@tribune.com<br><br>
cdizikes@tribune.com<br><br>
<br><br>
</i></font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#008000">415 863-9977<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#0000FF">
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.Freedomarchives.org</a></font><font size=3> </font></body>
</html>