<html>
<body>
<font size=3><b>MOVE 9 PAROLE: Young Teen Gets Jaded By Justice
System<br>
</b><a href="http://phillyimc.org/en/node/66687" eudora="autourl">
http://phillyimc.org/en/node/66687<br><br>
</a>by Linn Washington, Jr. | 05.04.2008 <br><br>
Last week’s Parole Board decision involving that MOVE trio (who’ve served
time longer than the average third-degree murder case) underscores the
pollution of politics in the justice system....The reason why so many
people feel racism infects law, from police to judges to prisons, results
from so many being jerked by the justice system so often. <br><br>
YOUNG TEEN GETS JADED BY JUSTICE SYSTEM<br><br>
By Linn Washington Jr.<br><br>
Like many young people during this unusually energized political season
Eddie started a petition campaign.<br><br>
Politics definitely drives the petition started by this 13-year-old
Southwest Philadelphia resident.<br><br>
But his campaign has nothing to do with presidential candidates or any
others seeking political office.<br><br>
Eddie’s petition involves his grandfather; a man currently incarcerated
in a Pennsylvania prison yet is now eligible for release on
parole.<br><br>
Eddie wants his grandfather home.<br><br>
“I did the petition because I ain’t seen him since I was a baby,” Eddie
said recently during a conversation in Center City. “I don’t think his
incarceration is right.”<br><br>
Eddie’s grandfather is serving a 30-100-year prison term for the fatal
shooting of a Philadelphia policeman three decades ago this
August.<br><br>
Eddie’s grandfather is Eddie Africa, one of the MOVE 9 convicted for the
death of Officer James Ramp during the violent clash with police in the
city’s Powelton Village section on August 8, 1978. <br><br>
Based on actions by the state’s Board of Probation and Parole last week,
it doesn’t appear that Eddie will see his granddad come home any time
soon.<br><br>
Last week this Board denied parole to three female members of the MOVE
9.<br><br>
That ruling means more prison time for Debbie Africa, Janet Africa and
Jeanene Africa. (All MOVE members adopt ‘Africa’ as their last
name.)<br><br>
Board members based their denial on four rationales according to
published reports: refusal to accept responsibility; showing a lack of
remorse; denying the nature and circumstance of the offense; and
receiving a negative recommendation from the prosecuting
attorney.<br><br>
This parole denial pleased Philly’s tough-as-nails DA Lynne Abraham who
stated in a statement that the imprisoned MOVE members “should serve as
much time as possible.”<br><br>
While Abraham, in her statement, criticized this trio for never
expressing regret for the death and injury on 8/8/78, a statement issued
by the MOVE organization blasted the Parole Board and prosecutors for
imposing unjust standards.<br><br>
MOVE’s statement castigates the Parole Board for demanding admissions of
guilt as a condition for parole from persons who’ve “maintained their
innocence from the very beginning…”<br><br>
All of those MOVE members convicted for that 1978 clash received the same
30-100-year sentence despite police testifying to only seeing the five
male members with guns during that fatal clash.<br><br>
The judge that found those MOVE members guilty after a non-jury trial
justified slapping the same sentence on the men and women with the
specious statement that since they went to trial “as a family” they
should leave his courtroom with the same prison sentence.<br><br>
This judicial stance sliced up the concept of punishment fitting the
crime.<br><br>
This judge also admitted publicly that after hearing testimony during
that 19-week trial, he didn’t know who fired the fatal shot.<br><br>
Who fired the fatal shot is a lingering question.<br><br>
Police testimony during that 1980 trial stated the bullet that killed
Officer Ramp and the bullets that seriously injured three other officers
came from one gun.<br><br>
Police never were able to link a specific MOVE member to the weapon they
contend fired the fatal shot.<br><br>
Further, the fatal bullet wound Officer Ramp sustained entered his back
while he was facing the MOVE compound where MOVE members were huddled in
the basement.<br><br>
“How can my grandfather shoot a cop in the back if the cop is standing in
front of where they say my grandfather was?” young Eddie wonders. “From
what I’ve heard about what happen, the experience ain’t right!”<br><br>
Just hours after the end of that August 1978 shootout, then Philadelphia
Mayor Frank Rizzo ordered demolition of the MOVE compound on N.
33<sup>rd</sup> Street near Powelton Avenue.<br><br>
This demolition constituted the destruction of a crime scene because it
took place after a hasty police investigation of questionable
thoroughness and before any independent investigation of the scene on
behalf of MOVE members charged with crimes that day.<br><br>
Further, this demolition violated an order issued by a Philadelphia judge
a few days earlier barring city officials from razing the property for
any reason.<br><br>
Many thought the MOVE females would obtain parole given irregularities
and their being unarmed.<br><br>
Two female non-MOVE members also arrested on 8/8/78 did not land in
prison. <br><br>
Authorities dropped charges against one of the non-MOVE members for lack
of evidence and the other female won a jury acquittal – again for lack of
evidence of wrong-doing.<br><br>
The Parole Board’s “blatantly unfair decision can only serve to validate
the argument that the MOVE 9 are indeed ‘political prisoners,’” contends
local activist/journalist Hans Bennett, a supporter of MOVE and death-row
journalist Mumia Abu-Jamal.<br><br>
Last week’s Parole Board decision involving that MOVE trio (who’ve served
time longer than the average third-degree murder case) underscores the
pollution of politics in the justice system.<br><br>
Last week’s decision by the NYC judge to acquit the three policemen
involved in the fatal shooting of unarmed Sean Bell symbolizes this
pollution.<br><br>
That judge said he found the version of the fatal event presented the
officers’ attorneys more credible than testimony of Bell’s two friends --
the victims.<br><br>
A Philly judge acquitted the three policemen charged with the vicious
beating of a MOVE member on 8/8/78 – a beating captured by TV
cameras.<br><br>
The reason why so many people feel racism infects law, from police to
judges to prisons, results from so many being jerked by the justice
system so often.<br><br>
<b>--Linn Washington Jr. is an award-winning writer who teaches
journalism at Temple University. This article originally appeared in the
Philadelphia Tribune Newspaper.<br><br>
</b> <br>
--This article is also featured by Journalists for Mumia Abu-Jamal at
abu-jamal-news.com and move9parole.blogspot.com <br><br>
 <br><br>
<br><br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#008000">415 863-9977<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#0000FF">
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.Freedomarchives.org</a></font><font size=3> </font></body>
</html>