<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=4><b>7M in U.S. jails, on
probation or parole<br><br>
</b></font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=2>KASIE
HUNT      Associated
Press                   
Thu, Nov. 30, 2006<br><br>
WASHINGTON - A record 7 million people - or one in every 32 American
<br>
adults - were behind bars, on probation or on parole by the end of <br>
last year, according to the Justice Department. Of those, 2.2 million
<br>
were in prison or jail, an increase of 2.7 percent over the previous
<br>
year, according to a report released Wednesday.<br><br>
More than 4.1 million people were on probation and 784,208 were on <br>
parole at the end of 2005. Prison releases are increasing, but <br>
admissions are increasing more.<br><br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=2 color="#CC0066">Men still far
outnumber women in prisons and jails, but the female <br>
population is growing faster. Over the past year, the female <br>
population in state or federal prison increased 2.6 percent while the
<br>
number of male inmates rose 1.9 percent. By year's end, 7 percent of
<br>
all inmates were women. The gender figures do not include inmates in
<br>
local jails.<br><br>
"Today's figures fail to capture incarceration's impact on the <br>
thousands of children left behind by mothers in prison," Marc Mauer,
<br>
the executive director of the Sentencing Project, a Washington-based
<br>
group supporting criminal justice reform, said in a statement. <br>
"Misguided policies that create harsher sentences for nonviolent
drug <br>
offenses are disproportionately responsible for the increasing rates
<br>
of women in prisons and jails."<br><br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=2>From 1995 to 2003, inmates in
federal prison for drug offenses have <br>
accounted for 49 percent of total prison population growth.<br><br>
The numbers are from the annual report from the Justice Department's
<br>
Bureau of Justice Statistics. The report breaks down inmate <br>
populations for state and federal prisons and local jails.<br><br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=2 color="#CC0099">Racial
disparities among prisoners persist. In the 25-29 age group, <br>
8.1 percent of black men - about one in 13 - are incarcerated, <br>
compared with 2.6 percent of Hispanic men and 1.1 percent of white <br>
men. And it's not much different among women. By the end of 2005, <br>
black women were more than twice as likely as Hispanics and over <br>
three times as likely as white women to be in prison.<br><br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=2>Certain states saw more
significant changes in prison population. In <br>
South Dakota, the number of inmates increased 11 percent over the <br>
past year, more than any other state. Montana and Kentucky were next
<br>
in line with increases of 10.4 percent and 7.9 percent, respectively.
<br>
Georgia had the biggest decrease, losing 4.6 percent, followed by <br>
Maryland with a 2.4 percent decrease and Louisiana with a 2.3 percent
drop.<br><br>
<a href="http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/">
http://www.mercurynews.com/mld/mercurynews/news/breaking_news/</a> <br>
16126559.htm<br><br>
<br><br>
<br><br>
<br><br>
</font><font size=3>_______________________________________________<br>
News mailing list<br>
News@womenprisoners.org<br>
<a href="http://womenprisoners.org/mailman/listinfo/news_womenprisoners.org" eudora="autourl">
http://womenprisoners.org/mailman/listinfo/news_womenprisoners.org<br>
</a></font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>