<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br><br>
Still Can’t Jail the Spirit<br>
Walking Artshow by Political Prisoner Tom Manning and others<br><br>
September 15th, Portland, Maine<br>
(see full statement below)<br><br>
On Friday September 15th, we will demonstrate that the government
and<br>
police still "Can't Jail the Spirit", with a walking artshow by
political<br>
prisoner Tom Manning and others. The art show will begin at 5pm at
the<br>
Woodbury Campus Center on USM(University of Southern Maine)'s campus,
and<br>
will travel on foot to Congress Square by 6pm in Portland, Maine.<br>
Tom's paintings will be displayed along the route and in the square,<br>
along with art from local artists. At Congress Square there will also
be<br>
food, signs, and more information about the work and history of the<br>
artists represented at the exhibit. Speakers will include Ray Luc<br>
Levasseur, lawyers from the National Lawyers Guild, and an open mic,
at<br>
which all members of the public who believe in expression free from
police<br>
control are encouraged to bring poems, music, art, and their free
speech.<br><br>
<br>
Statement by the Portland Victory Gardens Project<br><br>
On Friday September 8th, the University of Southern Maine (USM)
censored<br>
"Can't Jail the Spirit: Art by Political Prisoner Tom Manning &
others"<br>
when university President Richard Pattenaude declared that Tom's
paintings<br>
would be taken down from the walls of the gallery at Woodbury Campus<br>
Center. Pattenaude's abrupt cancellation has alarmed USM students
and<br>
faculty, and other members of the greater Portland community. USM's
act<br>
of censorship came on the heels of intense pressure from corporate<br>
sponsors, police officers and law enforcement associations from Maine
and<br>
other states. Further, the show was canceled without due process or<br>
notice to exhibit organizers or the USM community.<br><br>
So far, much of the media attention to this action has been dominated
by<br>
the words of the University and the police regarding this art show. We
are<br>
releasing this statement to respond to the president's action, and
to<br>
clarify the Portland Victory Gardens Projects views on political<br>
prisoners, free speech and human rights.<br><br>
Just 2 days prior to President Pattenaude's announcement about the
closing<br>
of the exhibit, the University stated that "Can't Jail the
Spirit"<br>
presented a unique opportunity for public dialogue and debate ­ in
keeping<br>
with USM's mission as a "comprehensive public university…for the
benefit<br>
of the citizens of Maine and society in general." But in his recent
press<br>
statement, President Pattenaude said that the show was canceled
because<br>
"any reasoned discussion of ideas has been overshadowed completely
by Mr.<br>
Manning's and Mr. Levasseur's criminal acts, and the pain and
suffering<br>
they caused." These two statements are clearly contradictory: in
censoring<br>
the art show, Pattenaude is limiting campus discussion on the
definition<br>
of the term political prisoner—a complete reversal from the art
exhibit's<br>
original intention! How can a true discussion on political prisoners
take<br>
place while the opinions of the prisoners and their supporters are
being<br>
suppressed?<br><br>
We believe that the power of the police—through pressure on the
University<br>
and its funders—is being used in this instance to limit free speech
and<br>
opinions that the government does not approve of. We see this action as
a<br>
bold effort by police forces to control ideas and opinions being
discussed<br>
on a public university campus.<br><br>
It is true that Tom Manning was convicted for the felony murder of a
New<br>
Jersey state trooper; Tom says he shot back in self defense because
the<br>
police shot at him first. Most of the controversy surrounding the
art<br>
show centers around this fact, but lost in the discussion is the fact
that<br>
Tom Manning is a political prisoner because he took action against
the<br>
racist, U.S.-backed apartheid regime in South Africa, and
U.S.-backed<br>
death squads and dictatorships in Central America. It is for these<br>
reasons that Portland Victory Gardens Project and many others around
the<br>
world recognize Tom Manning as a political prisoner.<br><br>
Controversy over the exhibit has also overshadowed the many positive<br>
contributions made by Tom Manning and Ray Luc Levasseur for the causes
of<br>
freedom and justice in Portland and beyond, through such organizations
as<br>
Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Portland Victory Gardens Project,
and<br>
SCAR. SCAR, an anti-prison and anti-racist group begun by former<br>
prisoners; helped to found a radical bookstore called Red Star
North;<br>
developed community programs such as self defense classes and a
community<br>
bail fund; worked against torture and abuse in the Maine prison
system;<br>
and published a newspaper. "Can't Jail the Spirit" documents
the work of<br>
Tom, Ray and others by telling about their time underground, and
their<br>
capture, trials and imprisonment.<br><br>
On Friday September 15th, we will demonstrate that the government
and<br>
police still "Can't Jail the Spirit", with a walking artshow by
Tom<br>
Manning and others. The art show will begin at 5pm at the Woodbury
Campus<br>
Center on USM's campus, and will travel on foot to Congress Square by
6pm.<br>
Tom's paintings will be displayed along the route and in the square,<br>
along with art from local artists. At Congress Square there will also
be<br>
food, signs, and more information about the work and history of the<br>
artists represented at the exhibit. Speakers will include Ray Luc<br>
Levasseur, lawyers from the National Lawyers Guild, and an open mic,
at<br>
which all members of the public who believe in expression free from
police<br>
control are encouraged to bring poems, music, art, and their free
speech.<br><br>
There is a power and humanity that flow through his Tom Mannings’<br>
paintings that transcends the confinement of prison walls and barbed
wire.<br>
His paintings provide a voice for the voiceless: indigenous women in<br>
Chiapas, Mexico struggling against colonization of their homeland;<br>
political exile and former political prisoner Assata Shakur; to a 3
year<br>
old girl who was shot to death by the Los Angeles Police Department.<br>
"Can't Jail the Spirit" will be rehung in a Portland gallery in
the near<br>
future, time and place TBA and will continue to other east coast
locations<br>
this winter. We call on all supporters of freedom and free speech to
rise<br>
up against this repression and celebrate our collective voices for<br>
liberation.<br><br>
For more information about Tom Manning you can visit:<br>
<a href="http://www.geocities.com/tom-manning" eudora="autourl">
www.geocities.com/tom-manning<br><br>
</a>For more information about U.S. Political Prisoners:<br>
<a href="http://www.thejerichomovement.com/" eudora="autourl">
www.thejerichomovement.com</a> or
<a href="http://www.ecoprisoners.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.ecoprisoners.org<br><br>
</a>For more information about the Portland Victory Gardens Project and
Can'ta<br>
Jail the Spirit: (207) 761-1504 or pvg@riseup.net<br><br>
----------------------<br>
PRESS ALERT - FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - September 13, 2006<br><br>
CENSORED ARTWORK ON VIEW AT THEPHOENIX.COM<br>
Paintings of a self-described political prisoner convicted of bombings
and<br>
involvement in police officer's death available at the Web site of
the<br>
Portland<br>
Phoenix<br><br>
Thirty-two paintings removed from display at the University of
Southern<br>
Maine are now available for viewing in an exclusive online exhibit
at<br>
thePhoenix.com.<br>
The paintings include landscapes real and imagined, scenes from the
Third<br>
World, and portraits of modern and historical political activists. Many
of<br>
those whose portraits Manning has painted have served - or are now
serving<br>
- prison time in connection with their actions.<br>
Other pieces address political themes, such as "Where's
Liberty," in which an<br>
African child turns away from the blue and red colors symbolizing
European<br>
colonization, toward a green field symbolizing land. "Bloody
Cotton"<br>
addresses the theme of chattel slavery, in which African slaves were<br>
brought to live in harsh conditions in America to harvest cotton,
among<br>
other tasks; it also serves as a reminder that imprisoned convicts are
the<br>
only exceptions from the Thirteenth Amendment to the US
Constitution,<br>
which abolished slavery and involuntary servitude.<br>
Some of Manning's work shows what society and the world have lost as
a<br>
result of sectarian conflict: "Bridge at Mostar" shows the
16th-century<br>
bridge in Bosnia that was destroyed in the religious and ethnic
violence<br>
following the collapse of the nation of Yugoslavia. And "El
Salvador<br>
Massacre" depicts the lighting of a memorial candle near the body of
a<br>
victim of a massacre during that country's US-influenced political<br>
upheaval in the 1970s.<br>
Among those whose portraits are on display are:<br>
Safiya Bukhari, a former member of the Black Panther Party, and
co-founder<br>
of the Jericho Movement, which supports and publicizes the situations
of<br>
political prisoners.<br>
Assata Shakur, a former member of the Black Panther Party, and
godmother<br>
of hip hop artist Tupac Shakur.<br>
Betty Shabazz, widow of Malcolm X and an activist in her own right.<br>
Susie Pena, a 19-month-old girl shot by police while in her father's
arms<br>
during a 2005 standoff in LA.<br>
Jose Marti, a leader of the Cuban independence movement.<br>
Leonard Peltier, an activist for the rights of Native Americans.<br>
Che Guevara, a Latin American guerrilla leader.<br>
Fidel Castro, the Communist leader of Cuba.<br>
Jaan Laaman, one of Manning's co-defendants.<br>
Winona LaDuke, a Native American activist and former
vice-presidential<br>
candidate.<br><br>
Manning, who terms himself a political prisoner because he is
imprisoned<br>
for crimes he committed to make a political statement, is serving a
life<br>
sentence in federal prison in connection with politically motivated<br>
bombings of government and corporate locations in several states in
the<br>
1970s and 1980s, as well as being involved in an encounter in 1981
that<br>
left a New Jersey state trooper dead.<br>
His work, painted while incarcerated, had been on display in a show
called<br>
"Can't Jail the Spirit," at the University of Southern Maine in
Portland.<br>
The show, according to university publicity materials, was intended to
spark<br>
discussion of what the term "political prisoner" means, how it
might be<br>
defined, and how to determine who is one, and who is not. It is a
question<br>
particularly potent in today's world, where people who the US
government<br>
calls "insurgents" or "terrorists" believe themselves
to be held prisoner<br>
for actions they took based on political beliefs.<br>
Accompanying the images online and in the most recent issue of the<br>
Portland Phoenix are a news story about the cancellation of the
exhibit,<br>
and a review of the artwork by a Portland Phoenix art reviewer.<br><br>
Contact information:<br>
Peter Kadzis, executive editor, Phoenix Media/Communications Group:<br>
617.859.3236<br>
Jeff Inglis, managing editor, Portland Phoenix: 207.773.8900
x108<br><br>
Portland Victory Gardens Project<br>
PO Box 1992<br>
Portland, Maine 04104<br>
(207) 761-1504<br><br>
Free the Land!  Free all U.S. Political Prisoners!<br>
All Power to the People!<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>