<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
Why won't the FBI release Peltier files?<br><br>
  ("First published in Socialist Worker")<br><br>
By Joe Allen<br><br>
<br>
LEONARD PELTIER, one of America's longest serving political prisoners,
will <br>
turn 62 years old September 12. He has spent 30 years of his life behind
<br>
bars for a crime he didn't commit-in one of the most infamous cases of
<br>
political persecution in modern U.S. history.<br><br>
On September 8, Peltier's lawyer Barry Bachrach will argue in federal
court <br>
for the full release of all files maintained by the FBI's Minneapolis
office<br><br>
relating to Peltier.<br><br>
Peltier was an active member of the American Indian Movement (AIM) in the
<br>
1970s. He was framed for the murder of two FBI agents on the Lakota Sioux
<br>
Pine Ridge reservation in June 1975.<br><br>
AIM was a major focus of the FBI's notorious Counter Intelligence Program
<br>
(COINTELPRO) of the 1960s and '70s, which attempted to
"neutralize" the <br>
leadership of civil rights and revolutionary political
organizations.<br><br>
Two other AIM members, Bob Robideau and Dino Butler, were also indicted
with<br><br>
Peltier, but were found not guilty after a federal trial in July 1976.
<br>
Peltier, who had fled to Canada to avoid prosecution, was later
extradited <br>
to the U.S. and stood trial separately-he was found guilty of murder and
<br>
sentenced to life in prison.<br><br>
Peltier's extradition from Canada and trial in the U.S. was rife with
<br>
coerced testimony, manufactured evidence and prosecutorial misconduct.
Lynn <br>
Crooks, one of Leonard's prosecutors, admitted in 1985, "We can't
prove who <br>
shot those agents." Yet Peltier remains in prison because of the
<br>
determined-even fanatical-efforts of the FBI.<br><br>
So far, the FBI has released, partially or fully, 66,594 out of 77,149
pages<br><br>
related to Peltier's case. The other 10,555 pages were withheld from
<br>
Peltier's defense team and could potentially provide crucial information
in <br>
the campaign to free him.<br><br>
The FBI has refused to release the additional pages on the grounds of
<br>
"national security." Why a 61-year-old grandfather who has been
behind bars <br>
for three decades and is plagued by chronic illness is a threat to
national <br>
security has not been fully explained.<br><br>
A look at the Minneapolis FBI's Web site gives an idea of the agency's
<br>
strange view of the world-many times more space is devoted to Peltier and
<br>
AIM than to Osama bin Laden.<br><br>
In the waning days of the Clinton administration, when an effort was made
to<br><br>
secure a presidential pardon for Peltier, hundreds of FBI agents
responded <br>
by picketing the White House. Clinton backed away from a pardon. Since
<br>
September 11, federal prison authorities have refused media access to
<br>
Peltier. He has been unable to give an interview to the media in over
five <br>
years. Only his legal counsel and a small number of supporters and family
<br>
members can meet with him.<br><br>
The FBI's latest actions are symbolic of its 30-year persecution of
Peltier <br>
and his supporters-and are perpetuating a terrible injustice.<br><br>
 Note: Article by Joe Allen and "first published in Socialist
Worker"<br><br>
Leonard Peltier Defense Committee <br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>