<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br><br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=3>
============================== <br>
LEGAL UPDATE <br>
March 15, 2005 <br>
============================== <br>
  <br>
Constitutional Violations <br>
  <br>
On March 3, 2005, the Peltier attorneys filed a Motion to <br>
Summarily Proceed on Leonard's Petition for Habeas Corpus & <br>
to establish bail. <br>
<a href="http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/MotionToProceed.html">
http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/MotionToProceed.html</a>
. <br>
  <br>
As supporters may recall, on August 6, 2002, a <br>
Petition for a Writ of Habeas Corpus was submitted to the United <br>
States District Court in the District of Columbia.  This pending
<br>
appeal concerns the unconstitutional misapplication of the <br>
Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 (under which prisoners <br>
sentenced "under the old system" were to be issued release
<br>
dates no later than October 1989) by the U.S. Parole <br>
Commission.  On February 20, 2004, a Reply Brief on the <br>
government's Motion to Transfer (to the U.S. District Court in the <br>
District of Kansas) was filed.  In March, the DC District Court
<br>
granted the government's Motion to Transfer.  There has been <br>
no movement on this appeal for over a year. <br>
  <br>
Withheld Documents <br>
  <br>
Currently, there is a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit <br>
pending in the U.S. District Court for the Western District of New <br>
York.  In response to a FOIA claim, the Buffalo Field Office of the
<br>
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) released 797 pages in full <br>
or in part.  However, 15 pages are being withheld in their <br>
entirety.  Documents are supposed to be automatically <br>
declassified after 25 years under Executive Order 12958.  The <br>
FBI is arguing, however, that this material should not be subject <br>
to automatic declassification because it could damage or cause <br>
serious damage to national security & the so-called war on <br>
"transnational terrorism".  The FBI also contends that
release of <br>
the data could have a chilling effect on the free flow of <br>
intelligence information & strain diplomatic relations between the
<br>
United States & a foreign government.  <br>
  <br>
The catalyst for the Buffalo case is a heavily excised 1975 <br>
Teletype message from the Buffalo Field Office to then FBI <br>
Director Clarence M. Kelley that indicates that an informant was <br>
trying to infiltrate Peltier's defense effort.  Despite current FBI
<br>
denials, it should be noted that Kelley himself testified during the
<br>
trial of Peltier's two co-defendants that the government had used <br>
informants against the American Indian Movement.  Proof of a <br>
legal team infiltrator could be grounds for a new trial or an <br>
outright reversal. <br>
  <br>
On August 11, 2004, the Peltier attorneys filed a Memorandum <br>
of Law in Opposition to the government's Motion for Summary <br>
Judgment in the Buffalo case.   During oral arguments, on <br>
September 13, U.S. District Judge William M. Skretny reserved <br>
decision on the action.  However, the judge took issue with the
<br>
FBI's claims that it has acted in good faith in the processing of <br>
FOIA requests & is innocent of any impropriety, citing that two <br>
federal appeals courts have criticized the FBI's conduct in the <br>
Peltier case.  One such panel of judges said the government's <br>
decision to withhold evidence should be "condemned." 
Judge <br>
Skretny has yet to hand down a decision.  However, the law <br>
does not require a federal judge to render a decision within a <br>
specific period of time. <br>
<a href="http://www.peltiersupport.org/Newsroom/BuffaloHearing09132004.html">
http://www.peltiersupport.org/Newsroom/BuffaloHearing09132004.html</a>
<br>
  <br>
We also are waiting on U.S. District Judge Donovan W. Frank's <br>
ruling on our appeal of Magistrate Judge Susan Richard <br>
Nelson's decision to deny our request for expedited processing <br>
of Leonard’s FOIA request to the FBI Minneapolis field office. 
<br>
The records in this FBI field office are of particular interest as <br>
Minneapolis was the Office of Origin for the RESMURS <br>
investigation.  This FBI field office maintains 90,000 pages of
<br>
material responsive to Leonard’s FOIA request. <br>
  <br>
On December 31, 2004, the Legal Team received 5,112 pages <br>
of material from the FBI Minneapolis field office.  Unfortunately,
<br>
these records consisted solely of trial transcripts to which the <br>
Legal Team already has access.  <br>
  <br>
However, the FBI released an additional 5,167 pages of records <br>
from its Minneapolis field office on February 25, 2005.  The Legal
<br>
Team is presently reviewing this information. <br>
  <br>
Illegal Imprisonment <br>
  <br>
On March 9, 2005, a Motion for Expedited Hearing was filed <br>
concerning the December 15, 2004, Motion to Correct an Illegal <br>
Sentence filed in the U.S. District Court in the District of North <br>
Dakota. <br>
<a href="http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/MotionToExpedite.html">
http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/MotionToExpedite.html
</a><br>
  <br>
The federal jurisdiction conferred by the statutes under which <br>
Peltier was convicted & sentenced depended on the location of <br>
the alleged crime, not against whom the crime was allegedly <br>
committed.  The statutes required that the acts in question take
<br>
place "within the special maritime & territorial jurisdiction of
the <br>
United States".  Because the acts occurred on the Pine Ridge
<br>
Indian Reservation, which is neither "within the special maritime
<br>
[or] territorial jurisdiction of the United States," Mr. Peltier was
<br>
convicted & sentenced for crimes over which the U.S. District <br>
Court had no jurisdiction. <br>
  <br>
Peltier is calling on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure in <br>
effect at the time of his sentencing – specifically, Rule 35(a) – <br>
that provided that the Court could correct an illegal sentence at <br>
any time for any offense committed before November 1, 1997. <br>
  <br>
In a major civil lawsuit filed on September 2, 2004, in <br>
Washington, DC, the Peltier attorneys claim that U.S. <br>
Department of Justice officials have knowingly violated the <br>
Sentencing Reform Act of 1984 (and its amendments) & illegally <br>
extended Peltier's prison term by 12 years or more.   <br>
  <br>
The Sentencing Reform Act (SRA) was passed to address what <br>
Congress thought were inconsistent sentences imposed by <br>
different judges on different individuals convicted of the same <br>
crimes, as well as arbitrary parole decisions.  A new system – <br>
one of determinate sentences – was born & the Parole <br>
Commission was abolished. <br>
  <br>
At the heart of the suit is the refusal of the government to enforce
<br>
Title II, Chapter II, Section 235(b)(3) of the Sentencing Reform <br>
Act.  Effective on October 12, 1984, this part of the law ordered
<br>
that parole dates "consistent with the applicable parole
guideline" <br>
be issued to all "old system" prisoners within the following
five- <br>
year period, at the end of which time (on October 11, 1989) the <br>
Commission would cease to exist.  <br>
  <br>
On December 7, 1987, Congress enacted Public Law 100-182 <br>
which amended the SRA; repealed, in Section 2, the release <br>
criteria established by the original section 235(b)(3); & restored
<br>
the release criteria under 18 U.S.C. 4206.  This amendment did <br>
not restore the Parole Commission or remove its obligation to <br>
establish mandatory release dates, with sufficient time for <br>
appeal, by October 11, 1989.  These changes to the law also <br>
applied only to crimes committed after the law was amended on <br>
December 7, 1987.  The amendment simply did not apply to the <br>
Leonard Peltier or some 6,000 other "old system" prisoners
still <br>
held by the U.S. Bureau of Prisons today. <br>
  <br>
After it had technically ceased to exist, the Parole Commission <br>
claimed it needed more time to complete its work.  Congress <br>
inexplicably granted a number of after-the-fact extensions, the <br>
first in 1990 & the latest in 2002.  The suit claims these <br>
extensions were legally invalid & therefore inapplicable because,
<br>
at the time they were made, the Parole Commission had already <br>
been abolished.  <br>
  <br>
Mr. Peltier should have been given his certain release date by <br>
October 11, 1989, minus sufficient time to exhaust appeals.  Had
<br>
the Parole Commission followed the congressional mandate, <br>
Peltier would have been released over 12 years ago.  Lacking in
<br>
any statutory authority, the U.S. Parole Commission in fact <br>
illegally extended Leonard's term of imprisonment.  The failure of
<br>
the Parole Commission to give a release date to Peltier violated <br>
the ex post facto, Bill of Attainder, & Due Process clauses of the
<br>
U.S. Constitution. <br>
  <br>
The Peltier attorneys demanded a permanent injunction <br>
preventing further misapplication of the SRA & its amendments <br>
by the government; enforcement of the rights created by the <br>
original section 235(b)(3); &, due to irreparable injuries suffered
<br>
by Peltier, compensatory & punitive damages as determined by <br>
a jury. <br>
  <br>
On September 17, stating the claim appeared to be a habeas <br>
corpus petition, the court issued an Order to Show Cause why <br>
the case shouldn't be transferred to the U.S. District Court of <br>
Kansas.  On October 12, the legal team submitted its response &
<br>
filed the final complaint.  Nevertheless, the court recently ordered
<br>
the claim transferred to the U.S. District Court of Kansas & the
<br>
U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia affirmed the <br>
District Court's decision.  On March 15, 2005, the Peltier Legal
<br>
Team filed a Petition for a Writ of Mandamus from the U.S. <br>
Supreme Court to reverse the appellate court's ruling. <br>
<a href="http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/Mandamus03162005.html">
http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/Mandamus03162005.html</a>
 <br>
  <br>
In a related action, an Emergency Grievance was submitted to <br>
the Bureau of Prisons in early March 2005 to address claims of <br>
illegal detention resulting in personal injuries &/or irreparable
<br>
harm.  No response from prison authorities within a 48-hour <br>
period will result in court action. <br>
<a href="http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/Emergency.html">
http://www.peltiersupport.org/Docs/Historical/PostConviction/Emergency.html</a>
<br>
  <br>
============================================================ <br>
============================================================ <br>
  <br>
</font><font face="Arial, Helvetica" size=2>The
"PeltierSupport" Mailing List is a service of the <br>
Peltier Legal Team. <br>
  <br>
To SUBSCRIBE, visit the Peltier Legal Team's Web site <br>
at
<a href="http://www.peltiersupport.org">http://www.peltiersupport.org</a>
.  Scroll to the <br>
bottom of the home page, enter your name & e-mail <br>
address in the mailing list text box, & click on <br>
"Subscribe" & then "GO". <br>
  <br>
To UNSUBSCRIBE, please
<a href="mailto:WillowElderGrove@netscape.net?Subject=UNSUBSCRIBE">send
an e-mail</a> to the Legal <br>
Team.  To ensure your wishes are honored in this <br>
regard, we prefer to manually remove your address from <br>
our e-mail mailing list.  Thank you. <br>
 </font><font size=3> <br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>