<html>
  <head>
    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <div class="post-head">
      <h2 class="post-title"><a
          href="http://blog.freedomarchives.org/the-search-for-identity/">The

          Search for Identity</a></h2>
      <div class="meta"> <span class="sep">Posted on </span><a
          href="http://blog.freedomarchives.org/the-search-for-identity/"
          title="7:46 pm" rel="bookmark"><time class="entry-date"
            datetime="2015-12-14T19:46:11+00:00" pubdate="">December 15,
            2015</time></a><span class="by-author"></span><br>
        <b><small><small><small><a class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
                  href="http://blog.freedomarchives.org/the-search-for-identity/">http://blog.freedomarchives.org/the-search-for-identity/</a></small></small></small></b><a
href="http://blog.freedomarchives.org/the-search-for-identity/#respond"><span
            class="leave-reply"></span></a> </div>
    </div>
    <p>During my third semester at the Freedom Archives I cataloged the
      raw audio materials of Colin Edwards’ series on Californians of
      Mexican Descent. In this ten part radio program from the early
      1960s, Edwards interviewed Mexican-Americans from various
      socioeconomic backgrounds in order to create a comprehensive
      series that grasps the multiplicity of the Mexican-American
      experience. Through a series of patterned questions asked to each
      interviewee, themes including conflict over identities, pressures
      towards assimilation and divisions between generations, were all
      explored. It was interesting to find that many of the themes
      present in this series are sentiments that still exist within
      Chican@ communites. There is an underlying sense of not qualifying
      as solely Mexican or American, but rather needing to successfully
      navigate through and occupy both spheres. Although there were many
      relatable issues, one thing that struck me when listening to these
      interviews was the various outlooks towards discrimination faced
      by the Mexican-American community.</p>
    <p>Accounts of racial, social and economic discrimination varied
      amongst the interviewees but having grown up in a predominantly
      Latino community, I was unaware of discrimination towards Chican@s
      in educational or professional settings. I never felt like a
      “minority” in the community which I grew up in and those
      surrounding me I was always part of a majority population where
      there was no discrimination based on being “other”. It was not
      until I moved away for college that I was made so conscious of my
      ethnicity and culture. At home, it was easy to navigate being
      Mexican-American because most people were Latino so there was a
      semblance of a shared experience. Now that I have left that
      comfort zone and I interact with diverse populations I feel the
      need to be an American who simultaneously embodies and educates
      others on the whole Latino experience, who points out the
      intersections of gender, race and economic standing. In college, a
      defining feature of my identity is the fact that I am Mexican. I
      am often questioned about my language, customs and asked to
      challenge ill-informed stereotypes. At home I am seen as too
      American because I am not fluent in Spanish and I don’t retain
      traditional customs and beliefs, I am deviating from my
      upbringing.</p>
    <p>After listening to individuals sharing their sentiments and
      experiences, I felt a sort of validation. Never before had I
      worked with materials in an academic setting that explores what
      for me is a lived reality. Seeing this specific form of social
      history documented and studied in such a way reinforces the
      importance of individual lived realities. Even in institutions of
      higher education where students are actually given the chance to
      study different histories, they don’t always get the chance to
      work with such personal accounts that resonate with and reinforce
      overarching historical themes.</p>
    <p>If you would like to support our internship program you can make
      a donation <a
        href="https://co.clickandpledge.com/sp/d1/default.aspx?wid=33005">here.</a></p>
    <p>-Ariana Varela</p>
    <div class="moz-signature">-- <br>
      Freedom Archives 522 Valencia Street San Francisco, CA 94110 415
      863.9977 <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated"
        href="http://www.freedomarchives.org">www.freedomarchives.org</a>
    </div>
  </body>
</html>