<html>
<body>
<h1><b>Ward Churchill returns to CU for unsanctioned
class</b></h1><font size=3>
<a href="http://dailycamera.com/news/2007/oct/03/churchill-returns-for-unsanctioned-class-prof/" eudora="autourl">
http://dailycamera.com/news/2007/oct/03/churchill-returns-for-unsanctioned-class-prof/<br>
</a></font><h2><b>Controversial ex-professor bars press from
classroom</b></h2><font size=3>By
<a href="http://dailycamera.com/news/2007/oct/03/churchill-returns-for-unsanctioned-class-prof//staff/heath-urie/">
Heath Urie</a>
(<a href="http://dailycamera.com/news/2007/oct/03/churchill-returns-for-unsanctioned-class-prof//staff/heath-urie/contact/">
Contact</a>)<br>
Wednesday, October 3, 2007 <br><br>
Former University of Colorado professor Ward Churchill on Tuesday began
what he told students would become a series of classes held at the school
despite being fired from his position in July.<br><br>
Churchill elicited applause and handshakes from the majority of the 30 or
so CU students and area residents who came to hear his lecture, which he
titled "ReVisioning American History: Colonization, Genocide and
Formation of the U.S. Settler State."<br><br>
Churchill, who did not allow the Camera to attend the class, said the
group would come up with various topics to discuss.<br><br>
"I've been invited by people who are concerned with content of the
mind," Churchill said.<br><br>
Churchill sparked a national furor in 2005 after his essay on the Sept.
11 terrorist attacks called some victims "little Eichmanns," a
reference to Adolf Eichmann, who helped carry out Hitler's plan to
exterminate Europe's Jews during World War II.<br><br>
The controversial former professor was invited to speak in a classroom at
CU's Eaton Humanities Building by a group of student supporters who
rented out the space. Churchill handed out a class syllabus, which
includes scheduled classes to be held Oct. 9 about colonialism, Oct. 23
on genocide and Oct. 30 about racism.<br><br>
A written introduction to the class states that it "carries no
credit, fulfills no institutional requirements, involves payment of no
tuition, entails no paycheck to its instructor. ... It is therefore in no
sense bound by the rules supposedly governing courses offered in the
university catalogue."<br><br>
Aaron Smith, a 24-year-old senior political science and ethnic
studiesmajor, said he helped organize the class because he and other
students wanted to hear what Churchill had to say.<br><br>
"We were deprived of his teaching," Smith said of the
university's decision to fire Churchill, who taught American Indian
studies. "He was one of the most valuable professors we've had on
this campus."<br><br>
CU regents voted 8-1 to fire Churchill because of academic-misconduct
violations. Churchill has not been allowed to hold official classes on
the campus since May 2006, when a panel of scholars found patterns of
deliberate academic-misconduct violations, including plagiarism and
fabrication.<br><br>
Tuesday's class, which student organizers said would likely continue for
three weeks and then reconvene in the spring for a "second
semester," is not sanctioned by the university. University spokesman
Bronson Hilliard on Tuesday emphasized that Churchill was speaking at a
"private event."<br><br>
The event drew the attendance of former Churchill students and those who
had only heard his name before through media reports of his controversial
tenure at CU.<br><br>
</font><h3><b>Tracking Churchill</b></h3><font size=3><b>Last we
knew:</b> University of Colorado regents voted 8-1 to fire controversial
professor Ward Churchill on July 26 amid accusations of academic
misconduct.<br><br>
Churchill said after the vote: "I am going nowhere."<br><br>
<b>Latest:</b> Churchill appeared Tuesday night at CU's Eaton Humanities
Building for what he said was the first of a series of classes, titled
"ReVisioning American History: Colonization, Genocide and Formation
of the U.S. Settler State." The class is not sanctioned by the
university.<br><br>
<b>Next:</b> Churchill plans to convene his class on Oct. 9, 23 and 30. A
student organizer said Churchill will also return for a "spring
semester."<br><br>
"I'm coming into this very skeptical," said Russell Hedman, a
21-year-old senior political science major at CU. "I'm skeptical
that there's something here that I'm missing  but I'm also coming into
this with an open mind."<br><br>
Kelly Tryba, a CU journalism instructor who was holding class next door
to Churchill's lecture, was critical of Churchill for not allowing the
Camera inside the classroom.<br><br>
"I think any student group should be able to rent out a room and
have someone speak; but anyone should be able to go," she said.
"The freedom of speech goes both ways."<br><br>
Two men who identified themselves as event organizers turned away three
male CU students at the door, calling them
"agitators."<br><br>
One of the men watching the door, who did not give his name, became
physical with a Camera reporter who tried to enter the room  grabbing
his arm and pushing him  prompting a report to police.<br><br>
<br><br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#008000">415 863-9977<br><br>
</font><font size=3 color="#0000FF">
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.Freedomarchives.org</a></font><font size=3> </font></body>
</html>