<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
A February 10 New York Times article "UN Troops Fight<br>
Haiti’s Gangs One Street at a Time," about violent<br>
military operations in the poorest neighborhoods of<br>
Port-au-Prince by MINUSTAH, the UN Peacekeeping<br>
operation in Haiti, repeats justifications for the<br>
raids proffered by the UN, but fails to report on the<br>
operations’ “collateral damage”- dozens of people<br>
killed or wounded by MINUSTAH bullets. Nor does the<br>
article mention that the supposed beneficiaries of the<br>
attacks- Haiti’s poor- oppose them.<br><br>
Reporter Marc Lacey’s 1600-word article about violence<br>
in the Cité Soleil neighborhood quotes extensively<br>
from named and unnamed MINUSTAH sources, but uses only<br>
48 words from Haitians living in Haiti. And none of<br>
them support the MINUSTAH raids. The article fails to<br>
mention the frequent, large-scale protests against<br>
MINUSTAH, even though its top photo shows a MINUSTAH<br>
soldier preparing to deploy teargas against a protest.<br>
The Times uncritically repeats MINUSTAH spokesperson<br>
David Wimhurst’s denial that civilians are being<br>
killed by MINUSTAH bullets, ignoring ample contrary<br>
evidence provided by Cité Soleil community groups,<br>
Haitian human rights groups, the mainstream media and<br>
even the UN itself (on January 31, MINUSTAH chief<br>
Edmond Mulet, MINUSTAH’s head, publicly conceded that<br>
“there has been collateral damage, definitely”).<br>
The president of the Haitian Senate’s Human Rights<br>
Commission described the massive December 22, 2006 UN<br>
military assault on Cité Soleil as "a crime against<br>
humanity." The Bureau des Avocats Internationaux,<br>
Haiti’s most respected human rights lawyers, have<br>
documented 31 reported deaths (including children and<br>
the elderly), 33 wounded and 238 people displaced from<br>
the assault. Eyewitnesses reported that a wave of<br>
indiscriminate gunfire from heavy weapons began about<br>
5 a.m. and continued for much of that day. Cité Soleil<br>
resident Rose Martel told Reuters, "they [MINUSTAH]<br>
came here to terrorize the population. I don't think<br>
they really killed any bandits, unless they consider<br>
all of us as bandits." John Carroll, a U.S. doctor who<br>
treated victims of the assault in their homes, was<br>
told that "a UN helicopter circled [Cité] Soleil and<br>
fired bullets down on the homes of thousands of<br>
people." The UN conceded its helicopter was there, but<br>
denied firing from it. Dr. Carroll’s patients showed<br>
him the bullet holes in their roof.<br><br>
The Times uncritically accepts the chilling premise of<br>
the UN’s operation: that in the words of MINUSTAH’s<br>
top Commander, General Carlos Alberto dos Santos Cruz<br>
of Brazil, the UN can and should “cleanse these<br>
areas.” The article repeats the UN’s list of<br>
“trophies” from raids on January 25 and February 9-<br>
young men killed- but MINUSTAH does not tell and the<br>
Times does not ask about the procedures required by<br>
international, Haitian and almost any national law for<br>
pursuing people accused of criminal behavior:<br>
warrants, arrests, evidence and some judicial<br>
procedure before execution. <br><br>
Many of the neighborhoods now under MINUSTAH siege are<br>
bastions of support for Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the<br>
democratically-elected president whose government was<br>
overturned in a U.S.-backed Feb.29, 2004 coup, and<br>
Aristide's progressive Lavalas Party, still the<br>
largest political formation in Haiti. Haiti's poorest<br>
residents recall that the UN refused President<br>
Aristide’s request for help to support his embattled<br>
constitutional government in early 2004, but later<br>
sent MINUSTAH to consolidate the 2004 coup d’etat (the<br>
only time in history the UN has deployed a<br>
Peacekeeping Mission without a peace agreement to<br>
support, see Harvard Law School’s Keeping the Peace in<br>
Haiti?).<br><br>
MINUSTAH’s bullets will not stop the violence in Cité<br>
Soleil, any more than American bullets are stopping<br>
violence in Baghdad. The real enemy there is poverty,<br>
which can only be fought with weapons like food,<br>
healthcare and jobs, an approach taken by Aristide’s<br>
Lavalas government before the 2004 coup ended its<br>
progressive reforms. The UN will not recognize this<br>
unless public opinion forces it to, and public opinion<br>
will not mobilize unless the New York Times and other<br>
papers start covering MINUSTAH’s activities with<br>
integrity and balance.<br><br>
So please write the Times today, to let the editors<br>
know that you care about Haiti and care about balanced<br>
media coverage. Letters must be sent by Friday 2/16.<br>
They must be 150 words or less, and contain your name,<br>
address, and telephone number. Letters can be emailed<br>
toletters@nytimes.com or faxed to (202)556-3662.<br><br>
Sample letters are below. 150 words is not much space,<br>
so it is best to make one point clearly, and leave<br>
other points to others. Choose the issue that strikes<br>
you the most, and feel free to modify or personalize<br>
it.<br><br>
For more background on the UN in Haiti:<br>
<a href="http://www.haitisolidarity.net/article.php?id=148" eudora="autourl">
http://www.haitisolidarity.net/article.php?id=148<br>
</a>
<a href="http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/39640" eudora="autourl">
http://www.pambazuka.org/en/category/features/39640<br>
</a>
<a href="http://www.ijdh.org/articles/article_recent_news_2-11-07c.html" eudora="autourl">
http://www.ijdh.org/articles/article_recent_news_2-11-07c.html<br><br>
</a>For information on sending letters to the Times:<br>
<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/lettertoeditor.html" eudora="autourl">
http://www.nytimes.com/ref/membercenter/help/lettertoeditor.html<br><br>
</a>Sample letters:<br><br>
1) To the Editor:<br><br>
The article “U.N. Peacekeepers Fight Gangs in<br>
Haiti”(Feb.10), overlooks a fundamental question: why<br>
are huge numbers of residents of Cité Soleil, Haiti’s<br>
largest shantytown, repeatedly protesting the presence<br>
of UN troops?<br><br>
Your front cover photo shows demonstrators facing a UN<br>
peacekeeper with a tear gas canister, but the article<br>
does not mention any protests, or the UN’s role in<br>
legitimizing the coup regime which replaced the<br>
democratically-elected government of Jean-Bertrand<br>
Aristide in February, 2004.<br>
 <br>
Nor does the article mention the readily available<br>
evidence (from numerous human rights groups) that the<br>
UN has engaged in excessive force, killing scores of<br>
civilians.<br><br>
Why not cite people like the president of the Haitian<br>
Senate’s Human Rights Commission, who described a<br>
massive December 22, 2006 UN military assault on Cité<br>
Soleil as "a crime against humanity"?<br><br>
Instead of helping to demonize the poorest of<br>
Port-au-Prince’s neighborhoods, the Times should<br>
provide balanced coverage.<br><br>
Sincerely,<br>
Your Name<br>
Address/Phone Number<br><br>
2) To the Editor:<br>
“U.N. Peacekeepers Fight Gangs in Haiti” (February 10)<br>
ostensibly treats violence in Haiti’s Cité Soleil, but<br>
of the article’s more than 1600 words, only 48 are<br>
from Haitians in Haiti, none of whom share the<br>
article’s positive impression of the U.N. raids.<br>
The article fails to mention the frequent, large-scale<br>
protests against the U.N., especially in Cité Soleil,<br>
even though its top photo shows a MINUSTAH soldier<br>
preparing to deploy teargas against a group of<br>
protesters.<br>
The Times piece mimics the UN’s lethal error of not<br>
listening to the people of Cité Soleil. Haiti’s poor<br>
bear the brunt of violent crime, and want it stopped,<br>
but they understand that the raids are not working and<br>
are killing innocent civilians. Until the UN hears<br>
this message, their efforts will continue to fail.<br>
Sincerely,<br>
Your Name<br>
Address/Phone Number<br><br>
<br>
3) To the Editor,<br><br>
The article “U.N. Peacekeepers Fight Gangs in Haiti”<br>
(February 10) implies that UN military attacks on Cité<br>
Soleil were carried out at President René Préval’s<br>
insistence.<br><br>
In fact, as documented by reports from the University<br>
of Miami and Harvard University Law School, UN<br>
“peacekeepers” have engaged in joint operations with<br>
the notoriously brutal Haitian police since the June,<br>
2004 start of the UN mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH). And<br>
long before Préval’s February 2006 election, UN<br>
troops, at the urging of Haiti’s right-wing elite,<br>
launched military attacks on Port-au-Prince’s poorest<br>
neighborhoods which killed scores of unarmed<br>
civilians.<br><br>
Haiti’s dire problems, a direct result of over two<br>
centuries of exploitation by the “international<br>
community”, cannot be solved militarily. Jean-Bertrand<br>
Aristide and his progressive, democratically-elected<br>
Lavalas government understood this. It is to the<br>
eternal discredit of the U.S. that the Bush<br>
Administration backed the coup which ousted that<br>
government on February 29, 2004.<br><br>
Sincerely,<br>
Your Name<br>
Address/Phone Number<br><br>
<br>
+++<br>
4)  To the Editor,<br><br>
In “U.N. Peacekeepers Fight Gangs in Haiti” (February<br>
10), the commander of U.N. forces in Haiti declares<br>
that “there will be no tolerance for the kidnappings,<br>
harassment and terror carried out by criminal gangs.”<br>
Although the U.N aggressively pursues gangs in poor<br>
neighborhoods, it shows a high degree of tolerance for<br>
crime organized in Haiti’s comfortable neighborhoods<br>
or by the police.<br><br>
Even Mario Andresol, Haiti’s police chief, concedes<br>
that as many as 1/3 of his officers are involved in<br>
kidnapping and other crime. Several members of wealthy<br>
families have been implicated in kidnappings.<br><br>
The UN should fight crime in Haiti, but with a<br>
balanced approach, fighting crime wherever the<br>
criminals are, not just in poor neighborhoods. The<br>
Times should cover crime in Haiti the same way.<br><br>
Sincerely,<br>
Your Name<br>
Address/Phone Number<br><br>
<br><br>
Haiti Action Committee<br>
<a href="http://www.haitiaction.net    /" eudora="autourl">
www.haitiaction.net    </a>
<a href="http://www.haitisolidarity.net/" eudora="autourl">
www.haitisolidarity.net<br>
</a>510-483-7481<br>
haitiaction@yahoo.com<br><br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>