<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
sent by Andy Pollack<br><br>
See also:<br>
<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/08/AR2005110800287.html" eudora="autourl">
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/11/08/AR2005110800287.html<br>
</a>-- the best part is at the end: "'It's no wonder these kids are
protesting<br>
when their future looks like a dead end,' said Michel Narbonne, 59,
who<br>
sells stamps to collectors at a Paris street market. 'They are
frustrated,<br>
like the majority of French people. These kids are doing what most
French<br>
people have wanted to do for the past 10 years.'"<br><br>
(Which disproves a claim earlier in the article about the French
rejection<br>
of the EU being due to white racism. In fact the "Non" movement
was a huge<br>
working-class mobilization.)<br><br>
[Two reporters from *Le Monde* (Paris) gave this report on what some of
the <br>
rioters in France are thinking and feeling.  --Mark]<br><br>
Le Monde (Paris) - November 8, 2005<br>
<a href="http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0,1-0@2-3226,36-707261@51-704172,0.html" eudora="autourl">
http://www.lemonde.fr/web/article/0,1-0@2-3226,36-707261@51-704172,0.html<br>
</a>reposted at
<a href="http://www.ufppc.org/content/view/3602/" eudora="autourl">
http://www.ufppc.org/content/view/3602/<br><br>
</a>[Translated from *Le Monde* (Paris)]<br><br>
A NIGHT WITH 'RIOTERS' WHO FEEL 'RAGE'<br><br>
By Yves Bordenave and Mustapha Kessous<br>
Translated by Mark K. Jensen<br><br>
Sunday, November 6: 8:00 p.m.  Abdel, Bilal, Youssef, Ousman, Nadir,
and<br>
Laurent (their names have been changed) are at the foot of the
eleven-story<br>
cliff that is the "112" housing project in Aubervilliers<br>
(Seine-Saint-Denis).  When he joins them, Rachid, dressed in a bulky
down<br>
jacket, lights a cigarette and sets fire to the refuse bin. 
"It's too bad,<br>
but we have to," says Nadir.  For ten days, the scenario has
been repeating<br>
itself on a daily basis.  The small gang of this public housing
project on<br>
the rue Hélène Cohennec, where more than a thousand people live, want
to<br>
"break everything." Cars, warehouses, gymnasiums, are targets
of this anger<br>
that does not answer to any marching orders or organization.<br><br>
"If one day we get organized, we'll have hand grenades, bombs,<br>
kalashnikovs...  We'll say meet at the Bastille and it'll be
war," they<br>
warn.  Neither bosses nor Islamists seem to be telling them what to
do, much<br>
less manipulating them. For the time being, the 112 gang is acting alone
in<br>
its neighborhood: the "organization" is more like an improvised
party than a<br>
warlike undertaking.  "Everybody contributes something,"
Abdel explains.<br><br>
"We feel rebellion more than hatred," says Youssef, the oldest
of the band.<br>
Twenty-five, he says he's "calmed down" since he became
engaged, though.  He<br>
still feels "rage," though.  It's especially aimed at
Nicolas Sarkozy and<br>
his "warlike" vocabulary: "Since we're scum, we're going
to give that<br>
raciest something to vacuum up.  Words hurt worse than blows. 
Sarko has to<br>
resign.  We'll keep going as long as he doesn't
apologize."<br><br>
There is, added to this "rage," the incident of the tear-gas
bomb used<br>
against the mosque in Clichy-sous-Bois, one week ago.  "A
blasphemy,"<br>
according to Youssef.  "Gassing religious people who are
praying is<br>
something you don't do. They're insulting our religion." The
judicial<br>
investigation should determine whether the tear-gas bomb was thrown
inside<br>
the mosque or in front of the entrance.  All these young people have
stored<br>
up "too much rancor" to listen to appeals for calm. 
"It's like a dog<br>
against a wall, it becomes aggressive.  We're not dogs, but we're
reacting<br>
like animals," says Ousman.<br><br>
Laurent, 17, the youngest of the band, claims he "torched" a
Peugeot 607, a<br>
few feet from here, only two hours ago.  For them, nothing's
easier.  All<br>
you need is a glass bottle filled with gasoline and a rag for a fuse,
you<br>
break a window and throw the cocktail inside: in two minutes the car is
on<br>
fire, if it doesn't blow up first.<br><br>
Why burn these car that usually belong to someone they know? 
"We have no<br>
choice.  We're ready to sacrifice everything since we have
nothing," Bilal<br>
says in his own defense.  "We even burned a friend's car. 
He was furious,<br>
but he understood."<br><br>
The friend in question is here.  He's 21, works as kitchen helper in
a<br>
restaurant in Paris's 15th arrondissement, and doesn't disagree.  He
pulls<br>
out his cell phone and proudly shows the screen saver: the picture of
a<br>
police car on fire taken a few months ago during earlier events, after
the<br>
death of an Aubervilliers youth.  "You know, when you're waving
a Molotov<br>
cocktail, you say watch out.  There are no words for expressing what
you<br>
feel; you only know how to talk by setting fire."<br><br>
No recipe escapes their incendiary quest.  Thus, in more home-made
fashion,<br>
"acid bombs bought at Franprix" and stuffed with aluminum foil,
used by kids<br>
13 or 15 years old.  "When at that age all you have is
rebellion, it's<br>
because there's a serious problem," says Abdel, who expresses his
"fear of<br>
having kids who would be raised in rage."<br><br>
8:19 p.m., a fire engine siren sounds.  "Here come the
cops.  We're out of<br>
here," orders Youssef.  The band slips into the foyer. 
Here, the elevator<br>
only goes to two of the eleven stories of the building: the fifth and
the<br>
tenth.<br><br>
On the fifth floor, they feel safe from a possible police check. 
Bilal, 21,<br>
knows something about that: "Today, I was stopped two times. 
The cops put<br>
me on the ground while sticking a flash-ball (a handgun that fires
rubber<br>
bullets) in my face and insulted me." So he doesn't understand why
the<br>
government devotes "millions of euros to equipping the police when
they<br>
refuse to give a cent to open a youth center."<br><br>
Youssef and his gang are not fools.  They know how much the violence
they<br>
are setting loose creates prejudices against them.  "We're not
vandals,<br>
we're rioters," he says in his own defense.  "We're all
getting together, so<br>
that our rebellion will be heard," they say.  And to express
their<br>
discontent.  "In the band, we're all out of work, we have
nothing more<br>
coming to us," says Nadir, 25.  Like the others, he quit school
at 16 after<br>
failing the electrotechnical BEP [= brevet d'études professionnelles,
a<br>
vocational diploma].  Since then, all he's had is odd jobs as a
packer,<br>
loading pallets.  "Anyway, what else is there to do?" he
sighs.  "For 100<br>
CVs I sent, I got three interviews.  Even when I know somebody, I
get<br>
rejected," he says bitterly.  For them, school did
nothing.  "That's why<br>
we're burning them," says Bilal.<br><br>
And what if the provocative formulas of Nicolas Sarkozy gave them
the<br>
occasion they were waiting for?  Didn't they allow them to set free
this<br>
"rage," till now kept bottled up?  "We're drowning,
and instead of throwing<br>
us a buoy, they're pushing our heads underwater; help us," they
insist. <br>
These young people say they have "no reference points,"
they're<br>
"misunderstood," "victims of racial discrimination,"
"condemned to live in<br>
dirty cities," and "rejected." They hide neither their
gladness nor their<br>
"pride" that the riots are spreading everywhere: "There's
no competition<br>
between the projects.  This is pure solidarity."<br><br>
9:00 p.m.  The group goes back outside, at the bottom of the
cliff.  The<br>
firemen have extinguished the refuse bin.  Youssef and his friends
ask:<br>
"What are we waiting for?  Let's go burn
something."<br><br>
Translated by Mark K. Jensen<br>
Associate Professor of French<br>
Department of Languages and Literatures<br>
Pacific Lutheran University<br>
Tacoma, WA 98447-0003<br>
Phone: 253-535-7219<br>
Web page:
<a href="http://www.plu.edu/~jensenmk/" eudora="autourl">
http://www.plu.edu/~jensenmk/<br>
</a>Email: jensenmk@plu.edu<br><br>
<br>
</font>NYTr Digest, Vol 18, Issue 10<br><br>
<x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>