<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
COUNTERPUNCH<br>
'Tells the Facts and Names the Names'<br>
Edited by Alexander Cockburn and Jeffrey St. Clair<br>
Business Office<br>
P.O. Box 228<br>
Petrolia, CA 95558<br>
Tel: 1 (800) 840-3683<br>
Web:
<a href="http://www.counterpunch.org/" eudora="autourl">
http://www.counterpunch.org<br>
</a>E-mail: counterpunch@counterpunch.org<br>
- Tuesday, November 1, 2005 -<br><br>
-----<br>
____________________________________________________________________<br>
<br>
A Thousand Evictions a Day for Weeks<br>
WHY ARE THEY MAKING NEW ORLEANS A GHOST TOWN?<br>
____________________________________________________________________<br>
<br>
By BILL QUIGLEY<br>
<a href="http://www.counterpunch.org/quigley11012005.html" eudora="autourl">
http://www.counterpunch.org/quigley11012005.html<br><br>
</a>On Halloween night, New Orleans was very, very dark. Well over half
the<br>
homes on the east bank of New Orleans sit vacant because they still do
not<br>
have electricity. More do not have natural gas or running water.
Most<br>
stoplights still do not work. Most street lights remain out.<br><br>
Fully armed National Guard troops refuse to allow over ten thousand
people<br>
to even physically visit their property in the Lower Ninth Ward<br>
neighborhood. Despite the fact that people cannot come back, tens of<br>
thousands of people face eviction from their homes. A local judge told
me<br>
that their court expects to process a thousand evictions a day for
weeks.<br><br>
Renters still in shelters or temporary homes across the country will
never<br>
see the court notice taped to the door of their home. Because they will
not<br>
show up for the eviction hearing that they do not know about, their<br>
possessions will be tossed out in the street. In the street their<br>
possessions will sit alongside an estimated 3 million truck loads of
downed<br>
trees, piles of mud, fiberglass insulation, crushed sheetrock,
abandoned<br>
cars, spoiled mattresses, wet rugs, and horrifyingly smelly
refrigerators<br>
full of food from August.<br><br>
There are also New Orleans renters facing evictions from landlords who
want<br>
to renovate and charge higher rents to the out of town workers who
populate<br>
the city. Some renters have offered to pay their rent and are still
being<br>
evicted. Others question why they should have to pay rent for
September<br>
when they were not allowed to return to New Orleans.<br><br>
New Orleans, known for its culture and food and music, is now pushing
away<br>
the very people who created the culture and food and music. Mardi
Gras<br>
Indians live and paraded in neighborhoods that sit without electricity
or<br>
water. The back room cooks for many of the most famous restaurants
cannot<br>
yet return to New Orleans. Musicians remain in exile. Housing is scarce
and<br>
rents are soaring. Over 245,000 people lost jobs in September.
Public<br>
education in New Orleans has not restarted. The levees are not even up
to<br>
their flawed level in August.<br><br>
Dr. Arjun Sengupta, the United Nations Human Rights Commission
Special<br>
Reporter on Extreme Poverty, visited New Orleans and Baton Rouge last
week.<br>
He toured the devastated areas and listened to the evacuees still in<br>
shelters and those living out of town with family.<br><br>
Dr. Sengupta described current conditions as "shocking" and
"gross<br>
violations of human rights." The devastation itself is shocking,
he<br>
explained, but even more shocking is that two months have passed and
there<br>
is little to nothing being done to reconstruct vast areas of New
Orleans.<br>
"The US is the richest nation in the history of the world. Why
cannot it<br>
restore electricity and water and help people rebuild their homes
and<br>
neighborhoods? If the US can rebuild Afghanistan and Iraq, why not
New<br>
Orleans?"<br><br>
The longer the poor and working class of New Orleans stay away, the
more<br>
likely it will be that they never return. That, some say, is exactly
what<br>
those in power in New Orleans and Louisiana and the US must want.<br>
Otherwise, why are they making New Orleans a ghost town?<br><br>
Bill Quigley teaches at Loyola University New Orleans School of Law,<br>
Quigley@loyno.edu.<br><br>
Copyright  2005. All rights reserved. CounterPunch is a project of
the<br>
Institute for the Advancement of Journalistic Clarity.<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>