<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
Subject: Robert Williams<br>
From:    norman@ckln.fm<br>
Date:    Thu, August 18, 2005 10:30 pm<br>
To:      norman@ckln.fm<br>
--------------------------------------------------------------------------<br>
<br>
OPINION<br>
Williams' Legacy Lives On<br>
By NORMAN (OTIS) RICHMOND<br><br>
<br><br>
Black activist Robert F. Williams is all but forgotten by the
hip-hop<br>
generation and North Americans in general but his contributions were
as<br>
profound as Martin Luther King Jr.'s or Malcolm X's. So much so, that
when<br>
the Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) neglected to mention Williams
in<br>
their 13-part special Eyes on the Prize (1987 - 1990), General Baker,
a<br>
legendary Detroit trade unionist, lamented.<br><br>
Baker was introduced to Williams by listening to Radio Free Dixie
before<br>
he met in the flesh in Cuba.<br><br>
"I'll never forget because I was sort of influenced by Radio Free
Dixie. I<br>
remember they (Williams and his wife Mabel) used to have a theme
song.<br>
They took Smokey Robinson and The Miracles' song way over there and
turned<br>
it into a love song of a people. The poetic Robinson lyrics are: 'A
river<br>
ain't deep enough. A mountain ain't steep enough to keep me from
your<br>
side'. Listeners understood that it was more than a silly little
love<br>
song."<br><br>
It is significant that the mother of the civil rights movement, Rosa<br>
Parks, spoke at Williams' funeral in October 1996, and said that she,
and<br>
those who had marched with King in Alabama, had always admired
Williams<br>
"for his courage and his commitment to freedom. The work that he
did<br>
should go down in history and never be forgotten.<br><br>
"Like Patrice Lumumba, Franz Fanon, Medger Evers and Malcolm X,
Williams<br>
was a member of the class of 1925."<br><br>
He would have celebrated his 80th birthday on February 26, 2005.<br><br>
If the Freedom Archives has its way, Williams' legacy will be passed on
to<br>
the youth of the day and generations to come. A new CD and study
guide,<br>
Robert F. Williams: Self Respect, Self Defence & Self Determination,
as<br>
told by Mabel Williams and produced with the complete support of the<br>
Williams clan, will help spread the story of the Williams family.
And<br>
Radio Free Dixie: Robert F. Williams and the Roots of Black Power by<br>
Timothy B. Tyson will help put Williams in his proper place in
African<br>
American and world history.<br><br>
Williams, a small-town Southerner, became an international figure in
1961<br>
when he was forced to flee Monroe, N.C., first traveling to Cuba and
later<br>
to China. In the late 1950s, he had become president of the Monroe
branch<br>
of the National Association for the Advancement of Coloured People
(NAACP)<br>
and his followers used machine guns, dynamite and Molotov cocktails
to<br>
confront Ku Klux Klan terrorists. He was forced out of the United
States<br>
to avoid prosecution for allegedly kidnapping a White couple, whom
he'd<br>
actually saved from getting killed during an NAACP confrontation with
the<br>
Klan.<br><br>
When Williams was run out of the U.S., he used the modern
Underground<br>
Railroad and was helped by Canadians such as Vernal Olsen and his
wife<br>
Anne of Toronto.<br><br>
Tyson quotes Williams as writing: "One day the Toronto Globe and
Mail<br>
published a huge picture of me on its front page with an article
stating<br>
that the U.S. government had (hired) Canada to arrest and extradite
me."<br><br>
According to Tyson, Canadians then moved Williams to Nova Scotia
where<br>
there was a "refuelling stop for planes bound for
Cuba."<br><br>
After Williams was granted political asylum in Cuba, he was allowed to
set<br>
up Radio Free Dixie, a program of Black politics and music that he<br>
broadcasted back to the United States. It was an important show because
it<br>
helped Williams to win thousands of new converts to the civil rights<br>
movement.<br><br>
"Originally, I was broadcasting 50,000 watts, which could be heard
all the<br>
way up to Saskatchewan, Canada," said Williams.<br><br>
Williams lived in Cuba and China from 1961 until 1969. He fell out
with<br>
the Cubans over the race question, but never was hostile to Fidel
Castro<br>
or Che Guevara. Williams' first book, Negroes with Guns, was dictated
in<br>
Cuba in 1962. Wayne State University Press recently republished this<br>
volume.<br><br>
After moving to China, Williams convinced Mao Zedong to issue two<br>
statements in support of the African American liberation struggle.
While<br>
on the international scene, he found time to travel to North
Vietnam,<br>
North Korea and Tanzania, where he met with Ho Chi Minh and other
leaders<br>
from Asia and Africa, but Tyson's book does not discuss these issues
in<br>
detail.<br><br>
In 1969, he decided to return to the United States despite the
charges<br>
against him. North Carolina officials promptly attempted to extradite
him<br>
from Michigan, where he had settled, on the old kidnapping charges.
A<br>
court battle lasted several years, though finally, the charges were<br>
dropped.<br><br>
Another biography by Robert Carl Cohen, The Black Crusader, deals
with<br>
Williams' travels in Asia and Africa. Cohen's account of Williams riding
a<br>
motorcycle across Tanzania is fascinating and one hopes that
Williams'<br>
forthcoming autobiography, While God Lay Sleeping, will shed more light
on<br>
his international work.<br><br>
The strength of Tyson's biography of Williams is that it ably
documents<br>
the life and times of a man who should never be forgotten. While
Williams<br>
was influenced by earlier organizations, such as the African Blood<br>
Brotherhood (a U.S.-based group that rivalled Marcus Garvey's
Universal<br>
Negro Improvement Association), and African Caribbeans and African<br>
Americans such as Cyril Briggs of St. Kitts and Nevis and Harry
Haywood,<br>
Williams' own militancy is in his DNA. Tyson points out that
Williams'<br>
grandfather, Sikes Williams, had been a race man before him. His<br>
grandmother, Ellen Isabel Williams, actually gave him an ancient
rifle<br>
that once belonged to her husband.<br><br>
This book is a must read for Black History Month, or any other month.
In<br>
fact, Tyson sums up Williams legacy beautifully. "This is a story of
one<br>
of the most influential African American radicals of a generation
that<br>
toppled Jim Crow, created a new Black sense of self, and forever
altered<br>
the arc of American history."<br><br>
The CD and resource guide are available for $22 ($24 internationally)
from<br>
Freedom Archives, 522 Valencia Street, San Francisco, CA 94110 (415)<br>
863-9977 email: info@freedomarchives.org.<br><br>
Toronto-based journalist and radio producer Norman (Otis) Richmond can
be<br>
heard on Diasporic Music, Thursdays, 8 p.m.-10 p.m., Saturday
Morning<br>
Live, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-1 p. m. and From a Different Perspective,<br>
Sundays, 6-6:30 p.m. on CKLN-FM 88.1 and on the internet at
<a href="http://www.ckln.fm/" eudora="autourl">www.ckln.fm</a>.<br>
He can be reached by phone at 416-595-5068 or by e-mail at
Norman@ckln.fm.<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>