<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br><br>
What to the Prisoner is the Fourth of July?<br>
By YaVonne Anderson, WireTap. Posted July 4, 2005.<br>
<a href="http://www.alternet.org/story/23324" eudora="autourl">
http://www.alternet.org/story/23324<br><br>
</a>Being in prison on the Fourth of July is a painful reminder of
how<br>
misleading the American story of independence can be.<br><br>
On July 5, 1852, Frederick Douglass delivered a speech to the
Rochester<br>
Ladies' Anti-Slavery Society. His speech, "What to the Slave is the
Fourth<br>
of July?" questioned the coexistence of celebrating American freedom
and the<br>
practice of American slavery.<br><br>
Over 150 years have passed since 1852. This Fourth of July, as a
young<br>
African-American woman who is currently imprisoned, the time seems
long<br>
overdue to again question what this holiday represents and misrepresents.
In<br>
the year 2005, the contradictions of Douglass' 1852 may seem all too<br>
clear--even obsolete. But the legacies of those contradictions are
still<br>
with us in our growing criminal justice system. In fact, the
connections<br>
between the slavery of our past and our mass imprisonment practices of
today<br>
are not discreet once we understand history.<br><br>
The most obvious link is the 13th Amendment, passed in 1865. While many
of<br>
us know that this amendment abolished slavery, we often forget its
one<br>
exception--that slavery could continue for people convicted of crime.
In<br>
fact, this exception was what first made racialized mass
imprisonment<br>
possible.<br><br>
So while the institution of slavery as we knew it was abolished, the<br>
institutionalized racism behind that system was able to evolve through
that<br>
loophole. Once paired with the Black Codes criminalizing African
Americans<br>
for actions only they could be convicted of, like vagrancy and possession
of<br>
firearms, prison populations that provided cheap labor through<br>
convict-leasing programs transformed from nearly all-white to
overwhelmingly<br>
black. To avoid punishment, some whites even wore black face during<br>
robberies.<br><br>
After emancipation, even African Americans who avoided integration into
the<br>
newly racialized criminal justice system possessed few freedoms. We
were<br>
still hung and lynched, beaten, raped, and otherwise degraded. Although
our<br>
forced labor built so much of this nation's infrastructure and wealth,
we<br>
were robbed of our self-identity, our family and kinship ties, our worth
and<br>
value--to be left without resources for survival and often set up to
be<br>
thrown in prison.<br><br>
Today, institutionalized racism continues to evolve, reminding us that
we<br>
are all survivors of slavery and its legacies. While segregation is
no<br>
longer legal, it is the reality for most Americans. So when my home state
of<br>
California loses $9.8 billion in education spending as it has over the
last<br>
four years, those cuts impact our schools the most. Even though crime
rates<br>
are falling, the government continues to under fund our schools
while<br>
investing in a growing prison industrial complex. Just last month,<br>
California opened its 33rd prison, spending $700 million just for
the<br>
mortgage and committing to $110 million each year after that.<br><br>
It has taken the U.S. government over 100 years to only recently
acknowledge<br>
the history of lynching through a formal apology. We are still victims
and<br>
survivors of police brutality and the "driving while black"
phenomenon. And<br>
the laws continue to eliminate African Americans, as well as other people
of<br>
color and poor whites for warehousing in U.S. jails and prisons.<br><br>
In its jails and prisons, the government reproduces many of the
dehumanizing<br>
conditions of slavery. It breaks up our families by taking us far away
from<br>
our communities and loved ones, making it hard for them to come and
visit.<br>
Like slavery, prisons create conditions where abuse and rape are<br>
commonplace. We are denied human affection, proper clothing,
nutritional<br>
food, proper medical care - sometimes to the point of medical abuse -
and<br>
education, despite a high demand and need for it. We're deprived of<br>
laughter, love and kindness. There are few programs that prepare us
to<br>
re-enter our communities, which contribute to high recidivism rates.
And<br>
while under the law, our bodies count for more than 3/5 of a person in
terms<br>
of electoral votes, those votes go to the communities we are locked up
in,<br>
not the communities we came from. And, as with under slavery, most of us
are<br>
still denied the right to vote at all, under felon disenfranchisement
laws.<br><br>
For all of these reasons, I can say that being in prison is a form
of<br>
modernized slavery, new millennium style.<br><br>
Being in prison on the Fourth of July is a painful reminder of how<br>
misleading the American story of independence is. This Fourth of July,
we<br>
must re-examine who experiences so-called American freedoms. We must<br>
re-define our cultural values and begin building a world we could
all<br>
celebrate. This world would no longer rely on domination, prisons and war
as<br>
a way to hide our social problems. Everyone would be able to access
quality<br>
education, healthcare, housing, and jobs, regardless of their color,
but<br>
also their gender, sexuality, religion or class. Now that would be
something<br>
to celebrate.<br><br>
YaVonne Anderson, also known as Hakim, is a young, self-educated,<br>
African-American lesbian who is currently imprisoned in California. She
is<br>
also a spoken-word poet who is featured on the CD, "The We That Sets
Us<br>
Free: Building a World Without Prisons," which is produced by
Justice Now, a<br>
human rights organization that works with women in prison.<br><br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>