<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
Franciscan friar the Rev. Leonardo Boff, was interrogated<br>
in Rome on September 7th 1984 by the office of the<br>
office of the Inquisition, headed by Cardinal Joseph
Ratzinger...<br><br>
The New York Times - August 20,
</font><font size=6 color="#FF0000"><b>1984<br><br>
</b></font><font size=3>Brazilian faces a Vatican inquiry over support
for social activism<br><br>
By Alan Riding<br>
Special to the New York Times<br><br>
Petropolis, Brazil, Aug. 17  A leading Brazilian theologian has
been<br>
summoned to a formal interrogation at the Vatican to answer charges that
he<br>
committed serious doctrinal errors while defending the social activism
of<br>
important sectors of Latin America's Roman Catholic Church.<br><br>
The theologian, Leonardo Boff, a 44- year-old Franciscan friar, is one
of<br>
the leading exponents of a radical interpretation of Christian
teachings<br>
known as the "theology of liberation," which has led thousands
of priests<br>
and nuns in the region to become deeply involved with the problems of
the<br>
poor.<br><br>
The principal complaint of conservative prelates is that the theology
of<br>
liberation has used Marxist parameters to analyze current social
conditions<br>
and, in the process, has sought to legitimize a "class
struggle" as the<br>
only way of bringing about economic and political change.<br><br>
Charges Stem From Book<br><br>
Friar Boff is to be interrogated in Rome on Sept. 7 by a commission
headed<br>
by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, Prefect of the Congregation for the
Doctrine<br>
of the Faith. The unspecified charges relate to the contents of a book
he<br>
has written, "Church: Charisma and Power." But church sources
here said<br>
they believed the entire theology of liberation would in effect go on
trial.<br><br>
"I don't think I'm being called simply for this book," Friar
Boff said in<br>
a conversation at a Franciscan seminary here. "The book reflects
the<br>
direction being taken by the church, particularly in Brazil. Rome will
judge<br>
more globally the meaning of this direction. Rome is worried that it
means<br>
change, that this will expose its flank to conflicts with sectors of
society<br>
opposed to change."<br><br>
The Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, the former Holy Office,
has<br>
corresponded in recent years with several "liberation
theologians" in<br>
Latin America, among them Gustavo Gutierrez of Peru and Antonio Moser
of<br>
Brazil. But Friar Boff is the first to be ordered to appear
personally.<br><br>
Procedure Considered Unusual<br><br>
This procedure is considered unusual and designed to draw public
attention<br>
to the purported doctrinal deviation. The last person to be summoned by
the<br>
Congregation was the Dutch theologian Edward Schillebeeckx in 1979. He
was<br>
cleared, but a Swiss theologian, Hans K"ung, who refused a request
to appear<br>
at the same time, was stripped of the status of Catholic
theologian.<br><br>
Friar Boff's summons has been given additional importance in the
region<br>
because it was disclosed soon after a Brazilian prelate, Agnelo
Cardinal<br>
Rossi, chief administrator of the Vatican Patrimony, announced during
a<br>
visit here that Rome would soon publish a document "putting the
question of<br>
liberation theology in its proper place." Cardinal Rossi has often
attacked<br>
liberation theology.<br><br>
To date, Pope John Paul II has seemingly focused his attention on the
direct<br>
involvement of some clergymen in politics, particularly in Nicaragua,
where<br>
this month he ordered four priests to leave their jobs in the
Sandinista<br>
Government. He has also publicly scoffed at the idea of the
so-called<br>
People's Church, a Catholic group supporting the Sandinistas, and he
has<br>
ordered priests and other Catholics to obey their bishops.<br><br>
But some students of church affairs here believe the Vatican has now
decided<br>
to make an example of Friar Boff to undermine the theological
pillars<br>
sustaining the social activism of many clergymen. Eugenio Cardinal
Sales,<br>
the Archbishop of Rio de Janeiro and a critic of liberation theology,
said<br>
after Friar Boff's summons that "it is a normal attitude for the
church to<br>
watch over the purity of the faith."<br><br>
Major Impact Seen in Region<br><br>
Any doctrinal ruling by the Vatican on the validity of liberation
theology<br>
would nonetheless have a major impact on Latin America. "A document
on this<br>
subject will have to be very well written so as not to give arguments
to<br>
those who throughout history have oppressed the people," Friar Boff
said.<br>
"It would be sad if, in the eyes of the poor, the church were to
side with<br>
those who detain history."<br><br>
Nowhere is church activism a more sensitive subject than in Brazil, not
only<br>
because the Catholic hierarchy played a leading role in denouncing
human<br>
rights violations during the last two decades of military rule here,
but<br>
also because four million Brazilians take part in 70,000 Christian
"base<br>
communities" that indirectly give the church a presence among labor
unions,<br>
Indian groups, slum organizations, militant feminist groups and
peasant<br>
movements.<br><br>
Further, the majority of the 358 bishops in Brazil, the world's most<br>
populous Catholic nation, are regarded as moderate or liberal. Some,
like<br>
Helder Camara, who is retiring as Archbishop of Recife and Olinda, and
Paulo<br>
Evaristo Cardinal Arns, Archbishop of Sao Paulo, have emerged as the<br>
principal forces of social change in their archdioceses.<br><br>
In his writings, Friar Boff has emphasized that with half the world's
Roman<br>
Catholics expected to be found in Latin America by the year 2000, the
region<br>
provides an opportunity for a "new cultural experience" for a
church that<br>
must inevitably seek greater autonomy from Europe.<br><br>
"We're not interested in breaking with Rome or the Pope," he
explained,<br>
"but we must ask what place are we to give to mulatto, Indian,
mestizo and<br>
black Christians whose values have not been absorbed by a church that is
an<br>
expansion of the European church."<br><br>
'Essays of Militant Ecclesiology'<br><br>
His book comprises, in his own words, 13 "essays of militant
ecclesiology"<br>
written during the 15 years that he has been teaching theology at
the<br>
Franciscan seminary in Petropolis, a mountain resort 26 miles north of
Rio<br>
de Janeiro.<br><br>
He said that when the book was first published in 1981 he was
fiercely<br>
criticized not only for those essays addressed to "base
communities" but<br>
also for his analysis of the power structures within the church,
"from the<br>
most feudal and aristocratic power to the most democratic
grass-roots<br>
power."<br><br>
One essay, titled "The Question of Human Rights Violations Within
the<br>
Church," examines the interrogatory procedure that he will now face
in<br>
Rome. In it, Friar Boff noted that those called before the Congregation
for<br>
the Doctrine of the Faith were neither allowed counsel nor informed of
the<br>
specific charges brought against them. "Everything is done in
secret, which<br>
feeds rumors harmful to the person and activity of the accused," he
wrote.<br>
After his own summons, he explained that his interrogation before
the<br>
commission would be recorded in a report that he and Cardinal
Ratzinger<br>
would sign before it is submitted to the full Congregation for a
decision.<br>
The ruling will then be presented to the Pope, he said. "If this is
linked<br>
to some punishment, I will accept it, although not without some<br>
melancholy," he added.<br><br>
Church sources here speculated that possible punishments could range
from<br>
withdrawal of the imprimatur for the book in question to reassignment
of<br>
Friar Boff from his teaching post here. But they said a verdict against
the<br>
theologian would be more important for the repercussions it would have
on<br>
the rest of the Latin American church.<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3>
<a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">
www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>