<html>
<body>
<font size=3><br>
GUANTANAMO ACCOUNT: 'I WAS SHACKLED, BEATEN, SUFFOCATED BY A PLASTIC
BAG<br>
AND DEPRIVED OF SLEEP. THIS IS HOW THEY FORCED MY CONFESSION'<br>
____________________________________________________________________<br><br>
THE INDEPENDENT<br>
UK: This Britain<br>
30 January 2005<br>
<a href="http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/story.jsp?story=606020" eudora="autourl">http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/story.jsp?story=606020<br>
</a>By Severin Carrell<br><br>
Exclusive: account by Briton released from Guantanamo Bay reveals
suffering<br>
in US captivity<br><br>
It was the moment - almost exactly three years ago - that Moazzam
Begg's<br>
dreams of setting up an Islamic school in Afghanistan were doused by a
ring<br>
at the door. It was midnight on 31 January 2001 that the heavily
armed<br>
Pakistani and US intelligence officials arrived at his doorstep. And it
was<br>
a year later that Moazzam Begg, 35, a former Islamic bookstore owner
from<br>
Birmingham, emerged as one of nine Britons imprisoned without trial
at<br>
Guantanamo Bay, accused of being a senior supporter of the 
al-Qa'ida<br>
network.<br><br>
Moazzam Begg describes the precise moment of his arrest in the style of
a<br>
pulp thriller. "Midnight. The door-bell rings, I answer, and guns
are put<br>
to my head. I'm pushed in, see a Tazer crackle and I am hooded.
Shackles<br>
and flexicuffs finish the job. They carry me to a vehicle and I
never<br>
return home again. I could not even say a word to my 
wife."<br><br>
That account is one of the key moments in a closely written 25-page<br>
statement for an American tribunal hearing in which Mr Begg attempts
to<br>
rebut US and British government allegations that he was an active member
of<br>
the al-Qa'ida network or a hardened Taliban sympathiser.<br><br>
A deeply religious, conservative Muslim, Mr Begg insists he had moved
with<br>
his wife Sally and their children to Kabul in July 2001 to set up a
private<br>
Islamic school for boys and girls - a girls' school the Taliban refused
to<br>
authorise.<br><br>
And, he writes, going to Kabul that year quickly became his 
greatest<br>
regret. "I have never wept so much in my entire life as during those
days<br>
..." he wrote. "I hated myself for being inane enough to bring
my family to<br>
Afghanistan. It still hurts just to recall the memory. Even these
three<br>
years in custody bear no equal to how destroyed my heart felt at
that<br>
fateful time."<br><br>
He recounts how he and his family fled Kabul after the US invasion began
in<br>
October 2001 following the World Trade Center attacks, to a town near
the<br>
Pakistani border. He went back to the capital several times to check
on<br>
their home, finally on the night Kabul fell. In the
"pandemonium", he<br>
became lost as refugees and Taliban fighters tried to escape.<br><br>
The US claims he retreated with al-Qa'ida forces to their mountain<br>
stronghold in Tora Bora and fought there - a claim he denies. He
used<br>
mountain roads to reach Pakistan, he admits, but states: "I do not
know<br>
what the place was called, nor did I stay to find out."<br><br>
After several days travelling, he traced his family in Islamabad and
began<br>
to resettle in the Pakistani capital. Barely three months later, he
was<br>
dragged barefoot from the house. Held in the Pakistani prison for
three<br>
weeks, he remembers hearing "yells and howls of pain" from
neighbouring<br>
cells, which were "black, damp, with dripping water and mouldy
walls". One<br>
evening, an interrogator assaulted an Afghan prisoner in front of Mr
Begg,<br>
forcing a confession to theft.<br><br>
Three weeks later, on 21 February 2002, Mr Begg was flown to
Kandahar.<br>
Issued with an "enemy prisoner of war" identity card by the
International<br>
Committee of the Red Cross and a ID number he had throughout his
detention,<br>
he was soon transferred to Bagram. There, he said, "I was held in
cells<br>
entitled 'Pentagon', 'Somalia', 'USS Cole', 'World Trade Center' 
and<br>
"Lebanon'."<br><br>
He was imprisoned for nearly a year in Afghanistan. "During this
period, I<br>
was forced to share a bucket as a latrine with several others;
forcibly<br>
stripped naked and photographed in front of several people; forced to
take<br>
communal showers in freezing cold water, denied natural light and
fresh<br>
food for the duration.<br><br>
"Interrogation began in earnest from the outset. I had already
witnessed<br>
the results of 'unsatisfactory' interrogations: sleep deprivation,
racial<br>
and religious taunts; being chained to a door for hours - with a<br>
suffocating plastic bag as a hood; literal arm twisting and forced
bowing<br>
and several physical beatings.<br><br>
"Two of these beatings resulted in the deaths of two detainees in
June and<br>
December of 2002. I was witness to both, in some fashion." He was
subject<br>
to "a series of particularly harsh interviews by FBI agents,"
he alleges.<br>
After the interrogation where he was shackled, hooded and assaulted,
"they<br>
threatened to have me sent to Cairo to face torture by Egyptian thugs
in<br>
the intelligence service". He was told detainees sent there
"confessed"<br>
within two days.<br><br>
In February 2003, Mr Begg was flown to Guantanamo Bay, and quickly
moved<br>
into new high-security isolation cells at Camp Echo - the section
reserved<br>
for "the worst of the worst". On 13 February, he was presented
with a<br>
statement "that I was made to sign, in effect, by coercion, and
under<br>
duress". It was that statement, thought to include his confession of
active<br>
involvement with al-Qa'ida that led to Mr Begg being one of the first
six<br>
Guantanamo detainees designated for trial as terrorists by President
Bush<br>
later in 2003. For nearly two years, until his transfer to the more
open<br>
conditions of Camp Delta last November, Mr Begg was held in 
solitary<br>
confinement and denied access to daylight or regular human
contact.<br><br>
The US and British intelligence agencies insist Mr Begg had a record
of<br>
allegiance to Islamist terrorists linked to Osama bin Laden, including
his<br>
visits to several "training camps" during the 1990s. They claim
to have<br>
found a money order with his name on it in an al-Qa'ida house in Kabul
in<br>
2001, a document his lawyers claim could easily be a child's fees for
Mr<br>
Begg's school.<br><br>
Security sources also say Mr Begg has never fully explained why he
visited<br>
Afghanistan during the 1990s, a claim he attempts to rebut in his<br>
testimony.<br><br>
Mr Begg admits visiting several camps, but insists they were brief trips
as<br>
an observer to learn more about Pakistani-based Islamist groups,
including<br>
some fighting in Kashmir. Those camps, he said, were originally set up
with<br>
CIA support to fight Soviet forces in Afghanistan. All were eventually
shut<br>
down by the Taliban after ideological clashes. One camp had links to
the<br>
anti-Taliban Northern Alliance, and none taught typical al-Qa'ida
tactics<br>
of suicide missions, car-bombings or hijackings. Mr Begg denies
taking<br>
military training.<br><br>
Additional reporting by Paul Lashmar<br><br>
Rambling, hand-written and disputed: the evidence the US relied
upon<br><br>
Martin Mubanga<br><br>
A joint British and Zambian citizen, he was arrested in Zambia in
February<br>
2002 after allegedly fleeing Pakistan after the fall of the Taliban
in<br>
Afghanistan.<br><br>
A former motorcycle courier from Wembley, London, Mr Mubanga, 32,
was<br>
accused of helping al-Qa'ida plot terrorist attacks on the US. He
allegedly<br>
carried a list of 33 Jewish organisations in New York when he was
arrested.<br>
He denied the allegations and retracted all his previous confessions
at<br>
Guantanamo last November. Mr Mubanga claims his passport had been
stolen<br>
and was a victim of identity theft. As The Independent on Sunday
revealed<br>
last year, Mr Mubanga wrote letters that accused Guantanamo guards
of<br>
threatening him with rape, of assaulting him and offering him to<br>
prostitutes.<br><br>
Feroz Abbasi<br><br>
An "autobiography" written by Abbasi, the former student
released from<br>
Guantanamo last week, suggests the Londoner advocated
"martyrdom" attacks<br>
by Muslims on US military targets.<br><br>
The admissions are among a series of claims in a batch of rambling<br>
handwritten documents, released last week by the US authorities to
justify<br>
their claims that Mr Abbasi, 25, is a committed supporter of
al-Qa'ida.<br><br>
To the anger of his lawyers, the batch of documents includes frank<br>
admissions about Mr Abbasi's childhood and emotional problems as a
teenager<br>
- breaching, they claim, an agreement with the US courts to keep
those<br>
pages confidential.<br><br>
Often decorated with doodles, elaborate chapter headings and small<br>
sketches, the documents expose him as a deeply troubled young man.
That,<br>
his lawyers claim, explains why he became attracted by the teachings of
the<br>
radical cleric Abu Hamza at Finsbury Park mosque.<br><br>
Mr Abbasi admits joining Abu Hamza's militant Supporters of Shariah
group<br>
in November 1999, and offering to leave for Chechnya to fight the
Russians.<br><br>
The cleric said he needed to prove himself and began actively to
cultivate<br>
the then 18-year-old. He was given militant tapes, books and
lectures.<br><br>
Mr Abbasi insisted he only wanted to protect threatened Muslims in
Kashmir<br>
or Afghanistan, not directly attack the US or the UK. Despite
volunteering<br>
to fight the US invasion of Afghanistan, he denies ever taking part
in<br>
battle.<br><br>
He also alleges that US interrogators subjected him to abusive
internal<br>
body searches, and to a series of unexplained injections at Guantanamo
Bay.<br><br>
His lawyers are adamant that these documents, written by a man held for
two<br>
years in solitary confinement and subjected to torture, are wholly<br>
unreliable.<br><br>
Richard Belmar<br><br>
A former Royal Mail worker, he is accused by the US of being trained at
an<br>
Afghan terrorist camp run by al-Qa'ida and of fighting for the
Taliban.<br><br>
Mr Belmar, 25, a Muslim convert from north-west London, admitted many
of<br>
the US allegations at a military tribunal in Guantanamo Bay last
November,<br>
including hearing Osama bin Laden speak and learning basic military<br>
training.<br><br>
But he also accuses his US interrogators of torturing him at the US
airbase<br>
in Bagram, including the claim he swore allegiance to Bin Laden and<br>
assaulted a suspected spy.<br><br>
One of four Britons freed from the US base last Tuesday, Mr Belmar is
now<br>
recovering with his family. His lawyers insist his admissions are<br>
unreliable, because he was coerced into confessing.<br><br>
Copyright  2005 Independent News & Media (UK) Ltd.<br><br>
*****<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3><a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>