<html>
<body>
<font face="Times New Roman, Times" size=3 color="#333333"><br>
<b>From:</b>    "Pan-African News Wire"
<ac6123@wayne.edu></font><font face="Times New Roman, Times" size=3 color="#003399">
<br><br>
<br>
</font><font face="Times New Roman, Times" size=3><b>Untrue
Confessions<br><br>
</b>June 15th, 2004 12:30 PM<br>
By James Ridgeway<br><br>
Additional reporting: Diana Ferrero, Alexander Provan, <br>
Oorlagh George, and Alicia Ng <br><br>
During last week's Judiciary Committee hearing at which <br>
Attorney General John Ashcroft was grilled about the issue of <br>
torture, New York's Chuck Schumer cautioned, "We ought to be <br>
reasonable about this. I think there are very few people in <br>
this room or in America who would say that torture should <br>
never, ever be used, particularly if thousands of lives are <br>
at stake." <br><br>
But in criminal cases, as the recent spate of overturned <br>
death row convictions has shown, confessions coerced by <br>
physical or psychological brutality often turn out to be <br>
wrongful confessions. <br><br>
Northwestern law professor Steven A. Drizin and University of <br>
California-Irvine criminology professor Richard A. Leo say <br>
that, according to studies, faulty confessions were <br>
the "primary cause of wrongful conviction in 14 to 25 percent <br>
of the documented cases." In addition, confession sometimes <br>
sets in motion an irreversible presumption of guilt. "The <br>
problem with military and police interrogators is that they <br>
believe they can tell whether a suspect or prisoner is guilty <br>
or innocent by observing his or her behavior," Saul Kassin, a <br>
psychology professor at Williams College, tells the <br>
Voice. "Once they make that judgment, they interrogate with <br>
the presumption of guilt, and this allows them to believe <br>
that what the suspects say is the truth." <br><br>
In the 1989 Central Park jogger case, the five young men <br>
arrested and found guilty and later cleared claimed they were <br>
coerced into making confessions by the police, who they said <br>
hit them, called them liars, and told them they'd be freed <br>
only after confessing. Brute force isn't the only tactic, of <br>
course. In 1985, Eddie Joe Lloyd, a mentally ill man in <br>
Detroit, confessed to the rape and murder of a 16-year-old <br>
girl. Police interviewed him several times in a hospital, <br>
while he was heavily medicated, and fed him evidence he could <br>
not possibly have known. Post-conviction DNA testing led to <br>
Lloyd's being set free. <br><br>
In a 9-11 related case, Abdullah Higazy, an Egyptian student <br>
studying in New York, was coerced by the FBI into admitting <br>
that he owned a pilot's radio found in his hotel room across <br>
from the WTC. Higazy was cleared only after the radio was <br>
actually claimed by an American commercial airline pilot. <br><br>
----------------------------------------------------------------------<br>
Distributed By: THE PAN-AFRICAN RESEARCH AND DOCUMENTATION CENTER<br>
               
211 SCB BOX 47, WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY<br>
               
DETROIT, MI 48202-- E MAIL:
</font><font face="Times New Roman, Times" size=3 color="#003399">ac6123@wayne.edu</font><font face="Times New Roman, Times" size=3>
<br>
======================================================================<br>
</font><x-sigsep><p></x-sigsep>
<font size=3 color="#FF0000">The Freedom Archives<br>
522 Valencia Street<br>
San Francisco, CA 94110<br>
(415) 863-9977<br>
</font><font size=3><a href="http://www.freedomarchives.org/" eudora="autourl">www.freedomarchives.org</a></font></body>
</html>